Hungarian Radiology

[Hospital at the foot of Kilimanjaro]

KIS Éva1

APRIL 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(02)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Sz. Gyermekklinika, Budapest

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Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[A small piece of renaissance]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnostics of the pancreas neoplasms - Onco Update 2005]

FORRAI Gábor, BODOKY György

[Authors reviewed the recent results of pancreas tumour radiological diagnostics and the place of the imaging and interventional methods. Systematical review of the most recent articles were summarized (July 2003-December 2004) in the following subjects: the etiology and clinico-pathology, general diagnostic and therapeutical questions of early pancreatic neoplasms, abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, MR-cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound-guided cytology, percutaneous biopsy, positron emission tomography, positron emission tomography - computed tomography, special pancreatic tumours. Experiences about the pancreas diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering in the daily practice. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiologic diagnosis of the diseases of the pediatric gynecology]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán, LÓRÁND Ágnes, LOVAS Györgyi, HÉJJ Ildikó

[The basic examination of the pediatric pelvic organs is the transabdominal ultrasound which provides useful information about the anatomy and the pathological changes and in the vast majority of cases it is sufficient for treatment planning and to establish the diagnosis. Additional examinations are needed in case of complex developmental anomalies, in suspition of tumor, in staging and follow up examinations of tumors. Among the modern imaging methods the use of CT and MRI can be considered. The authors described the most frequent diseases in their practice and gave a brief overview on anatomical and physiological basics which is necessary for the exact interpretation of the examinations.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Early detection of adult femoral head necrosis]

PALKÓ András, GION Katalin

[Adult avascular femoral head necrosis is common in young adulthood, and in 80% of cases affects male patients. The disease is bilateral in 40-80 %, and it may take several years to develop on the contralateral side. Late diagnosis and lack of early therapy can cause progressive disease and finally movement restraint. The diagnosis in early stage is crucial for choosing the most effective strategy in therapy. It is important to be aware of pathogenesis, clinical course and the differential diagnostic options of the disease, and these should be associated to the diagnostic findings at different imaging modalities. Based on this concept, we conclude that MR examinaton is the method of choice for the early (reversible) stage assessment. MRI of the hip is also able to evaluate and follow up the healthy contralateral side without further strain.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Dudoenum obstruction caused by duodenal diaphragm]

RUDAS Gábor, SEKYRA Pavel, PUMBERGER Wolfgang, POVYSIL Brigitta

[INTRODUCTION - Duodenum obstruction is a rare gastrointestinal developmental anomaly. It may be complete or incomplete. The incomplete or intrinsic form is often caused by an intraluminal membrane or web duodenal stenosis. The passage is existed with the help of a small perforated lake. Clinically the leading sign is the vomiting. CASE REPORT - A three days old baby admitted because of vomiting. Abdominal X-Ray and US could not found any reason of vomiting but the gastrointestinal contrast series had diagnostic value. Surgery proved the radiological diagnosis. CONCLUSION - For the diagnosis the conventional XRay and ultrasound is not sufficient in every case, the gold standard is the gastrointestinal contrast examination.]

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The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

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Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

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[Stroke associated dysphagia can have serious consequences such as aspiration pneumonia. The Hungarian guideline on nutritional therapy for stroke patients recommends dysphagia assessment, as early screening can optimize disease outcome and hospital cost. Thus far, this may be the first study in Hungarian that has documented a systematic review about the available validated dysphagia assessments of acute stroke. Purpose – The aim of this study was to summarize the instrumentally validated bedside dysphagia screening tools for acute stroke patients, which were published in the last twenty years. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of the validation studies, examine their study design, and sample the sub-tests and the diagnostic accuracy of the assessments. A systematic research was carried out of the literature between 2001 and 2021 in eight scientific databases with search terms appropriate to our objectives. Subjects of the study – 652 articles were found and were reduced to eight. We made a comparative analysis of these. The GUSS test reached a high level of sensitivity compared to the others. In our study sample, the prevalence of instrumentally confirmed dysphagia among acute stroke patients was 56.1%. The focus and the composition of the analyzed studies differed and posed problems such as the ambiguity of the concept of dysphagia, the difference in outcome indicators, or the timing of screening. The GUSS test, which offers domestic management, is a suitable tool for the Hungarian clinical use.]

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Capability of stroke scales to detect large vessel occlusion in acute ischemic stroke – a pilot study

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Rapid changes of stroke management in recent years facilitate the need for accurate and easy-to-use screening methods for early detection of large vessel occlusion (LVO) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Our aim was to evaluate the ability of various stroke scales to discriminate an LVO in AIS. We have performed a cross-sectional, observational study based on a registry of consecutive patients with first ever AIS admitted up to 4.5 hours after symptom onset to a comprehensive stroke centre. The diagnostic capability of 14 stroke scales were investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) values of NIHSS, modified NIHSS, shortened NIHSS-EMS, sNIHSS-8, sNIHSS-5 and Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation (RACE) scales were among the highest (>0.800 respectively). A total of 6 scales had cut-off values providing at least 80% specificity and 50% sensitivity, and 5 scales had cut-off values with at least 70% specificity and 75% sensitivity. Certain stroke scales may be suitable for discriminating an LVO in AIS. The NIHSS and modified NIHSS are primarily suitable for use in hospital settings. However, sNIHSS-EMS, sNIHSS-8, sNIHSS-5, RACE and 3-Item Stroke Scale (3I-SS) are easier to perform and interpret, hence their use may be more advantageous in the prehospital setting. Prospective (prehospital) validation of these scales could be the scope of future studies.

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