Hungarian Radiology

[Gynecological malignancies: review of the radiological diagnostics and image-guided therapy - Onco Update 2008]

FORRAI Gábor, BODOKY György

MARCH 22, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(01-02)

[The recent results of diagnostical imaging of gynecological tumours and the actual place of interventional radiological methods are discussed. Systematical reviews of articles published during the last year (2007) have been availed to discuss: cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, general and special imaging of the female pelvis, different uterine fibroid ablation methods (embolisation and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]). Experience of gynecological tumour imaging is growing rapidly, therefore, even the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are making their way into the daily routine. Some examinations become obsolete during the course of time and thus their further application should be avoided. In the meanwhile, some modalities prove their worth and become indespensable during the investigation of a given pathology.]

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