Hungarian Radiology

[General Assembly of the Association of the Hungarian Radiographers]

FEHÉR Lászlóné

JUNE 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Past, present and future of Department of Radiology of Pécs]

BATTYÁNY István

Hungarian Radiology

[13th French-Hungarian Radiologic Symposium and 5th Eastern-Central European Francophone Congress of Radiology]

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Hungarian Radiology

[Comparison of the results of lung helical CT and lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism]

WENINGER Csaba, BODROGI Gabriella, BOROS Szilvia, SCHMIDT Erzsébet, UDVAROS Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Katalin

[INTRODUCTION - The frequency of the pulmonary embolism is high and the underdiagnosis or delayed recognition of the disease occurs. Recently the helical CT is used to detect pulmonary embolism. The authors compare the results of single-slice spiral thoracic CT and lung scan. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During one year period chest CT examination was performed in 49 patients due to the suspicion of pulmonary embolism, in 30 of them lung scan was also performed. RESULTS - The results of the two diagnostic methods were the same in 21 cases out 30 (in 13/21 cases both methods demonstrated embolism and 8/21 cases the findings were normal). In the remaining nine cases the findings were different. CONCLUSIONS - The lung CT examination is a rapid, non-invasive method to depict the central pulmonary embolism and small infarcts in non fresh cases. The negative result of perfusion lung scan can exclude the pulmonary embolism. If the lung scan demonstrates perfusion defect(s), it is necessary to perform another diagnostic tests (e.g. chest X-ray, ventillation scan). While the lung scan is a cheap, simple method with low radiation dose, it can play important role in the screening.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Application of radiostereometry]

SZÉKELY Miklós

Hungarian Radiology

[Interventional radiology of multiple biliary stenoses]

ROSTÁS Tamás, BATTYÁNY István, HADJIEV Janaki

[INTRODUCTION - In palliative treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction the endoscopic and the percutaneous methods are the possible options. In multiple lesions the percutaneous method must be preferable. Decrease of the bilirubin level to normal gives an opportunity for further treatment of the oncology patients. CASE REPORT - Authors report three patients’ case history, when following an unsuccessful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous cholangiography revealed multiple biliary stenoses. In all cases successful stent implantations were performed (three stents in one patient, two stents in two patients). The bilirubin levels decreased rapidly and the quality of life improved in all cases. Following the stent implantation selective cytostatic treatment (one patient) and systemic cytostatic treatment (one patient) were performed. The mean survival time was 300 days. CONCLUSION - In the case of multiple biliary stenoses the percutaneous stent implantation is an acceptable palliative method, which permit the possibilities of further interventional radiological or oncological treatments.]

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