Hungarian Radiology

[Forum of Young Radiologists]

SOMOGYI Rita

OCTOBER 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

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LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[The role of MRI in the clinical examination following breast cancer screening]

SZABÓ Éva, BIDLEK Mária, GŐDÉNY Mária

[INTRODUCTION - Breast cancer screening was performed in 27 325 female patients at the National Institute of Oncology from 1st of January 2002 to May 30th of 2005. Complementary examinations were necessary in 1876 women. MR-mammography was performed in 65 of these cases. We were curious about in which cases MR mammography helps to make the diagnosis more accurate, how does it influence the therapy. We also studied, whether the number of surgical interventions because of benign breast lesions decreases due to MR mammography. PATIENTS AND METHODS - In 65 patients MR mammography was performed using non-contrast axial and coronal T1W and STIR sequences. After the injection of gadolinium four series of 3D FLASH (fast low angle shot) dynamic gradiens echo sequences were also applied. Subtraction of the non-contrast and contrast enhanced series were evaluated in addition to the intensity curves of the postcontrast series. RESULTS - MR mammography helped to evaluate dense breasts in 21 cases, to identify multifocal lesions in 6 cases and to differentiate the malignant-benign processes. In the course of the 65 post-screening examinations, malignant processes [BI-RADS IV-V (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System)] were diagnosed in 21 cases, benign processes (BI-RADS II-III) or negative results were found in 44 patients. CONCLUSION - MR mammography increased diagnostic accuracy, decreased the number of benign lesion-related surgical procedures and increased the accuracy in determining surgical radicality and establishing a therapeutic plan.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The force transmission of the distal endings of stent delivery systems]

SZIKRA Péter, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZÓLICS Alex, CSIKÁSZ Tamás

[INTRODUCTION - In cases of endovascular treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis, one of the most important aspects is to minimise embolic complications. Dislodging emboli may be influenced by the shape and size of tapered endings of stent delivery systems. Our team performed measurements and calculations on the emergence of force of the various tapered endings. MATERIAL AND METHOD - Five different commercially available stent dilivery systems were investigated. The thickness of the devices were measured and taking 5 mm normal artery diameter, the lumen size was calculated, above which the delivery system should dilate the lumen mechanically. By means of geometrical computer-constructions and measurements, we analysed the forces directed ahead and laterally, emerging on the surface of tapered endings during the passing through the stenosis. RESULTS - The stent delivery systems were between 5.0 and 5.9 F in diameter, and even the stent delivery system of lowest profile would dilate a stenosis of over 89%. The different endings are tapered with variable lengths. The force transmission on the vessel wall of different directions was distinct at the various points of the cone surfaces. The forces directed ahead were less than those directed laterally on the larger part of a cone surface. Irregularity of the cone surfaces distributed the forces unfavorably. Considering the features of tapered endings, the atraumatic introduction of the devices required a range of upper limits of stenoses between 89.76-98.04%, which are more feasible values than those deternined by shaft sizes. CONCLUSIONS - Our experimental work suggests, that the shape and size of the endings of stent delivery systems influence the forces affecting vessel wall plaques, and in this manner, embolic complications, during carotid stenting. The lowest risk of embolisation could be induced by using the longest and smoothest tapered endings.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Acromesomelic dysplasia du Pan]

KAISSI Al Ali, GHACHEM Ben Maher, CHEHIDA Ben Farid, KOZLOWSKI Kazimierz

[INTRODUCTION - Cartilage derived morphogenic protein (CDMP1) mutations account for several related disorders, ranging from prenatal lethal to very mild entities such as brachydactyly C. Two similar severe manifestations of CDMP1 mutations are du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndromes. CASE REPORTS - We report two second degree relatives with du Pan syndrome. Clinical history and full skeletal surveys were analysed and compared with the data from the literature. Frequent spontaneous abortions - probably manifestation of the lethal forms of CDMP1 mutations - were present in both families. Skeletal surveys of the patients showed similar acromesomelic abnormalities consistent with du Pan syndrome. CONCLUSION - The rare publications of du Pan syndrome present usually insufficient radiographic documentation. Better radiographic imaging is necessary to establish clear-cut criteria of differentiation between du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndrome.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Quality cost in radiology: the cost of repeated examinations]

KIS Zsuzsanna

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of the author is to describe the definition and types of quality cost in the health care services especially in the field of radiology. The proportion of the quality cost is based on the author's data and data from the literature. The ways of reduction of the quality cost is also discussed. MATERIAL AND METHODS - The author made a research based on a prior multicentric study to determine the loss derived from the excessive use of films used during the repeated radiological examination. The cost of wrong services nationwide is calculated on the basis of the loss per 1000 German point. RESULTS - Our short research showed that 300 000 Ft HUF + VAT per year was paid because of the excessive use of the films during the repeated examination points within the given period of time. The loss percentage per 1000 German points can be calculated based on the points generated during a given time. In this way there was more than 300 million HUF spent on defective services nationwide in 2002. CONCLUSION - The cost of defective services and resulting moral and financial losses justify the need for finding and reducing the costs. Quality control and quality improvement can be used to achieve the aims of controlling the processes by the right indicators. By discussing them the processes will improve, the costs will be lower and quality also improves. The patients and insurance companies who buy our services also have the same expectations.]

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[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

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[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

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[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A short chronicle of three decades ]

KAPRONCZAY Katalin

[Hungarian professional periodicals started quite late in European context. Their publish­ing, editing and editorial philosophy were equally influenced by specific historical and political situations. Certain breaking points of history resulted in termina­tion of professional journals (War of In­de­pendence 1848-1849, First and Se­cond World Wars), however there were pe­riods, which instigated the progress of sciences and founding of new scientific journals. Both trends were apparent in years after the fall of former Hungarian regime in 1990. The structure of book and journal publishing has changed substantially, some publishers fell “victim” others started successfully as well. The latters include the then-established publishing house Literatura Medica and its own scientific journal, Lege Artis Me­di­cinae (according to its subtitle: New Hun­garian Medical Herald) issued first in 1990. Its appearance enhanced significantly the medical press market. Its scientific publications compete with articles of the well-established domestic medical journals however its philosophy set brand-new trends on the market. Concerning the medical community, it takes on its problems and provides a forum for them. These problems are emerging questions in health care, economy and prevention, in close interrelation with system of public health institutions, infrastructure and situation of those providing individual health services. In all of them, Lege Artis Medicinae follows consequently the ideas of traditional social medicine.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

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[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]