Hungarian Radiology

[ESGAR 2003, Budapest]

MAKÓ Ernő

JANUARY 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(01)

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[The 9th ESSR Congress Valencia, 11-12 October 2002 Hungarian President to Lead the Society]

NÉMETH Éva

Hungarian Radiology

[A paradox of articular protective phenomenon: more serious-damaged rudimentary hand in rheumatoid arthitis]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella, DITRÓI Edit

[INTRODUCTION - The joints have been secured from rheumatoid arthritis by diminution of biomechanical effeciency. This effect was analyzed and named articular protective phenomenon three decades ago. CASE REPORT - A case of bilateral rheumatoid arthritis associated with unilateral developmental abnormality hand and bronchial asthma in a 35 year old female patient is presented. Her left 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th metacarpal bones moreover her fingers had not evolved. The patient has been treated by antiasthmatic steroid drugs for five years. Rheumatoid disorders of the affected left hand were more severe, than the abnormality of the normal upper limb. Eight years later the most severe bony lesions (ankylosis and mutilation) appeared on this side, only. CONCLUSION - The patient's hand was not saved by inborn bone defect in rheumatoid arthritis. The absence of articular protective phenomenon can be explained by the undisturbed innervation of limb, the motility of hypotrophic carpus besides to steroid-induced suppression.]

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Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginnings and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century. Part II. Hungarian experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[In Part I, I summarised the beginnings, the theoretical background and the international experiences of peritoneal dialysis. Hungarian publications related to peritoneal dialysis in the 1950s were focusing on the role of the method in the treatment of chronic renal disorders. The first dialysis centres were established in the medical universities of Hungary (Szeged in 1955, Budapest in 1960, Pécs in 1964, Debrecen in 1970) and in Miskolc in 1968. Despite the restricted hemodialysis capacities the intermittent technique of peritoneal dialysis did not spread in accordance with the demand. A survey conducted at the beginning of the 1970’s in the territory of the five counties with 1.5 million inhabitants revealed that considering the numbers of patients with renal diseases requiring dialysis, developing of a network of care and increasing the dialysis capacities is necessary and so is the development of a system of szatellite peritoneal dialysis, which was implemented with our support in 10 units of the county hospitals. A devoted and enthusiastic organiser of the nation-wide system of peritoneal dialysis was professor Taraba, who, due to his untimely death, was deprived of seeing the nation-wide spread of CAPD. At the beginning of the 1980’s the first reports on the favourable effects of CAPD appeared in Hungary. Solutions prepared in pharmacies and the lack of up-to-date equipment resulted in the frequent occurrence of peritonitis. In addition, the unfavourable memories of dialysis performed with bottled solutions (long treatment times, frequently peritonitis) were still vivid among patients and colleagues supervising the treatment. As a consequence, our survey conducted in 1991 revealed that the spread of CAPD all over the world in Hungary resulted in a significant increase of those treated with the intermittent method (more than 10% of the dialysis patients), while those treated with CAPD remained under 2%. Several reports on CAPD and the consequences that followed from them as well as the further training organised in the Szent Margit Hospital, Budapest and in Gánt, and also the guidelines issued by the Society of Hungarian Nephrologists the number of those treated with dialysis has exceeded 6000 in the past decade. 10% of them received CAPD/APD treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE ROLE OF MICRO-AROUSALS IN THE REGULATION OF SLEEP]

HALÁSZ Péter

[This work give a short account about a three decades research of the sleep microstructure. The studies, executed by the Strassbourg, Budapest and Parma schools, paved the way of exploring the participation of micro-arousals in the sleep regulation. It was shown that micro-arousals, not leading to instant arousal but influencing the later course of sleep are weaved into the network of sleep. A certain class of microarousals differs from the traditional desyncronisation-type and in a paradox way result a rebound like mobilisation of sleeplike activity with deltas and K-complexes. The desynchronisation- and synchronisation-type micro-arousals show different distribution along the sleep cyclicity and may play different role in sleep regulation. On the basis of the studies dealing with micro-arousals we can assume that beside the traditional long time constant, brain stem driven tonic chemical regulation, an other phasic regulation, with shorter time constant, underlied by the micro-arousals, also exist. This kind of phasic regulation makes sleep flexible and possible to adapt the actual sleep course to the inner and outer demands. An other important role of micro-arousals in pathological sleeps is to provide a gate for the different pathological events, pinpointing the key-points where these events could be expected in the sleep process.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical and genetic diagnosis of dravet syndrome: report of 20 cases]

SIEGLER Zsuzsa, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, HEGYI Márta, PARAICZ Éva, PÁLMAFY Beatrix, TEGZES Andrea, BARSI Péter, KARCAGI Veronika, CLAES Lieve, DE Jonghe Peter, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, FOGARASI András

[Objective and background - Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI; Dravet's syndrome) is a malignant epilepsy syndrome characterized by prolonged febrile hemiconvulsions or generalized seizures starting in the first year of life. Later on myoclonic, atypical absence, and complex partial seizures appear. When one of these seizure forms is lacking the syndrome of borderline SMEI (SMEB) is defined. Psychomotor delay resulting in mental retardation is observed during the second year of life. In most patients a de novo sodium channel alfa-1 subunit (SCN1A) mutation can be identified. By reviewing the clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data of our SMEI patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2008, we would like to share our experiences in this rare but challenging syndrome. Our results will facilitate the earlier and better diagnosis of Hungarian children with SMEI. Patients and methods - Clinical, EEG, MRI and DNA mutation data of 20 SMEI patients treated in the Bethesda Children’s Hospital (Budapest) were reviewed. Results - The first seizure appeared at age 6.3±3.0 months. At least one of the first two seizures were complex febrile seizures in 19/20 and unilateral seizures in 12/20 children. All children except for one showed hemiconvulsions at least once; all children had seizures lasting longer than 15 minutes. Eight of twenty patients had SMEB. DNA diagnostics identified an SCN1A mutation in 17 patients (6 missense, 4 nonsense, 4 frameshift, 2 splice site, 1 deletion) while 3 children had no mutation. Conclusion - Early diagnosis of SMEI is important for the avoiding unnecessary examinations and false therapies as well as for genetic counselling. Typical symptoms of SMEI are early and prolonged febrile hemiconvulsions with neurological symptoms, mental retardation and secondary seizure types later on. The presence of an SCN1A mutation supports the diagnosis. We propose the availability of molecular diagnostics and stiripentol therapy for SMEI children in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[One year follow-up after stroke. A preliminary feasibility study in Josephtown of Budapest]

SZŐCS Ildikó, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs, FEKETE Klára, ORBÁN-KIS Károly, VASTAGH Ildikó, FOLYOVICH András, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[Stroke is a major public health issue in Hungary with considerable regional differences in mortality. We have limited information to explain such regional differences. To assess these differences, we would need comparative followup studies optimally carried out by personal contact with the patient or the carer. According to several epidemiological studies, follow-up can be carried out with significantly lower cost and similar efficiency by telephone contact or regular mail. In this pilot study we intend to assess: 1. the efficacy of telephone follow-up one year after stroke in this geographical region 2. whether the efficacy of follow-up can be further increased with questionnaires sent out by regular mail 3. whether telephone and mail-based assessment is sufficient to perform a larger population based study. We included 135 patients hospitalized consecutively for acute cerebrovascular disease (stroke or TIA) by the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University in January and February of 2008. Based on residence, patients were divided into three groups: those living in the least wealthy district of Budapest (i.e. District-8); those living in other districts of the city; and those living in suburban areas. One year after the hospital treatment follow-up was possible by telephone in 76%. Further 12 patients could be contacted by questionnaire sent out by regular mail. Efficacy of follow-up was altogether 84%. Even in this small group of patients, we have found a tendency for more severe strokes (p=0.06) and higher acute case fatality (32% vs. 5%, p=0.029) in residents of District-8 of Budapest compared to those residing in more wealthy districts of the city and in suburban areas. Survival rate one year after stroke or TIA was only 39% in those living in District-8, 66% in those living in other districts and 75% in suburban dwellers (p=0.006). Telephone and mail-based questionnaires are insufficient for follow-up in these regions even when applied in combination. These preliminary data raise the possibility that the socio-economical conditions might influence stroke severity and outcome in the population. A larger study to address this issue would require more accurate definition of patient-groups and more efficient follow-up methods.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Young men’s knowledge about the human papillomavirus]

BALLA Bettina Claudia, TEREBESSY András, TÓTH Emese, BALÁZS Péter

[Introduction - Nearly the fifth of more than 100 HPV serotypes affect the anogenital region causing genital warts, penile and anal cancer. The incidence of male pathologies is lower than that of females (genital warts, vaginal, vulvar, cervical and anal cancer), however they are equally important in epidemiological terms. Methods - The aim of our questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was to assess the HPV-related knowledge of young men in 19 randomly selected high schools in Budapest. The anonymous questionnaires contained 54 items about socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, HPV-related knowledge and the attitude toward HPV vaccination. Results - We collected 530 completed questionnaires (86.74% response rate). 35.3% of the students knew that HPV was an STD and 3.2% was aware of transmission via skin contact. The majority (52.5%) linked cervical cancer to the viral infection, 7.7% linked HPV to the genital warts of females and 8.3% to the genital warts of males, 9.8% to penile cancer and 4.2% to anal cancer. 44.7% of the young men would have their future children vaccinated, while 24.5% remained uncertain. Conclusions - The young men’s knowledge about HPV was poor and they underestimated the risk of infection. This emphasizes the importance of targeted health education in this population. However, the students were mostly in favour of the HPV vaccination.]