Hungarian Radiology

[Diagnostic and therapeutical possibilities in constipation]

ILLÉS Anita, KIRÁLY Ágnes

MARCH 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(01-02)

[Constipation is a common gastrointestinal problem. The prevalence of symptoms related with constipation fluctuates from 3 to 20 per cent. Constipation occurs more frequently in the elderly people and in females and more frequent in case of inactivity and less fiber intake. Assesment of patients with severe constipation includes specialized investigations. Exclusion of primary organic causes has to be the first step, then metabolic, neurological and iatrogenic causes (such as medicament side effects, etc) have to be excluded. After these considerations special functional gastroenterological investigations are needed which contribute to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the cause of the constipation. Anorectal manometry, ballon expulsion test, defecography and colon transit studies allow us to distinguish between slow colon transit, colon inertia, different subtypes of outlet obstruction, and the constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The evaluation of these specific studies leads to the exact diagnosis and appropriate treatement for their problem can be given to the patients, which always has to be individually planed in all cases.]

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