Hungarian Radiology

[Diagnosis of pelvic injuries]

NÉMETH Katalin

FEBRUARY 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(01)

[In most cases, the cause of the pelvic injuries are traffic accidents and falling from heights. In the seriously injuried patients the bottomline of the treatment is to establish the accurate diagnosis. The role of X-ray technicians to should be emphasized. This paper briefly summarizes the anatomical and pathological basics of the pelvic injuries, the different the types of injuries and the examination methods of choice. Beside conventional X-ray studies, CT and portable ultrasonography are also important methods with special regard in the detection of the complications associated with pelvic injuries.]

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