Hungarian Radiology

[Current questions of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in the light of a visit to England]

PORUBSZKY Tamás, GICZI Ferenc, BALLAY László, PELLET Sándor

FEBRUARY 20, 2002

Hungarian Radiology - 2002;76(01)

[Physical-technical aspects of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology, because of its dependence on technology are of an extraordinary importance. The intention of Hungary to join EU makes at least the decrease of our lag in this respect unavoidable. Ministerial order 31/2001 (X. 3.) EüM which already came into force requires quality assurance in diagnostic radiology explicitly. This paper starts with definition of basic concepts, then outlooks shortly the history and present international situation of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology. We review preliminaries and the present situation in Hungary, including results of the National Patient Dose Assessment Programme till now. We think that the most efficient help to the initial steps of quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary may be the appropriate adaptation of experiences of the leading countries. Therefore we review experiences of one of the authors gained during visiting three medical physics centres in England in details. The following topics are discussed: legal requirements, types and levels of measurements, organizational problems, practical evaluation of measurements (including criteria of discarding equipment), patient dosimetry, personal dosimetry, mammography research, instrumentation of the radiology departments, calibration of measuring devices, questions of the so-called type testing and radiation protection training of workers.]

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