Hungarian Radiology

[Colorectal cancer screening: Lessons from the American experience]

BAFFY György1, TÁRNOKI Dávid László2, TÁRNOKI Ádám Domonkos2, BAFFY Noémi3

OCTOBER 20, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(03)

[Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies of our times. The disease takes many years to develop and is typically preceded by polyp formation, which allows timely screening and diagnosis. A number of tests and procedures have been developed to screen for colorectal cancer and its premalignant conditions. However, apparent heterogeneity of the disease, redundancy of the available screening modalities, as well as costs and potential pitfalls of these preventive measures require careful strategic planning. In the United States, recent advances in the campaign for colorectal cancer screening provide important lessons that may guide similar initiatives in Hungary.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. VA Boston Healthcare System and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, Radiológiai és Onkoterápiás Klinika, Budapest
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Budapest

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