Hungarian Radiology

[Coding Breast Cylinder Biopsies: B1-B5]

KULKA Janina, CSERNI Gábor, PÉNTEK Zoltán

JANUARY 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(01)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Ultrasonographic twin peak sign]

JAKOBOVITS Ákos

[INTRODUCTION - Author describes ultrasonographic twin peak sign in order to differentiate dichorial-diamniotic from monochronic-diamnotic pregnancy in early gestation. In case of dichorial pregnancy the chorial tissue is forming a triangle shape. In case of monochorial twins the two amnion layers are forming a ”T” shape. CASE REPORT - The first case represents a dichorionic pregnancy, while the second case is an example of monochorionic placental formation. CONCLUSION - The twin peak sign has clinical significance, because dichorionic pregnancies carry less risk of gestational and labor complications.]

Hungarian Radiology

[A Neuroradiology Postgraduate and Specialist Training Workgroup is Formed at the Radiology Clinic of the University of Szeged Faculty of Medicine]

PALKÓ András

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiation Health Science]

PORUBSZKY Tamás

Hungarian Radiology

[Diagnostic Errors in Radiology: What We Cannot Change and What We Must Do ]

LACZAY András

Hungarian Radiology

[A paradox of articular protective phenomenon: more serious-damaged rudimentary hand in rheumatoid arthitis]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella, DITRÓI Edit

[INTRODUCTION - The joints have been secured from rheumatoid arthritis by diminution of biomechanical effeciency. This effect was analyzed and named articular protective phenomenon three decades ago. CASE REPORT - A case of bilateral rheumatoid arthritis associated with unilateral developmental abnormality hand and bronchial asthma in a 35 year old female patient is presented. Her left 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th metacarpal bones moreover her fingers had not evolved. The patient has been treated by antiasthmatic steroid drugs for five years. Rheumatoid disorders of the affected left hand were more severe, than the abnormality of the normal upper limb. Eight years later the most severe bony lesions (ankylosis and mutilation) appeared on this side, only. CONCLUSION - The patient's hand was not saved by inborn bone defect in rheumatoid arthritis. The absence of articular protective phenomenon can be explained by the undisturbed innervation of limb, the motility of hypotrophic carpus besides to steroid-induced suppression.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Hungarian Immunology

[Pseudolymphoma orbitae]

VÁNCSA Andrea, GERGELY Lajos, NEMES Zoltán, BÍRÓ Edit, ILLÉS Árpád, BAKÓ Gyula

[INTRODUCTION - Pseudolymphoma orbitae is a rare and difficult entity. The cooperation of the pathologist and clinician is needed to properly manage the patient. CASE REPORT - The authors report the case history of a 38 years old male patient. His disease started at the age of 30. He was previously treated with allergic rhinitis. No definitive diagnosis was made for eight years. Several surgical biopsies were made from nasal mucosa, but no specific histologyical diagnosis was applicable. At the age of 30 he developed an unilateral exophthalmus on the left side. Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy was ruled out several times with laboratory analysis. High dose methylprednisone therapy was repeatedly given with limited results. At the age of 34 orbital CT and MRI scan confirmed the pseudotumour orbitae already compressing the optical nerve. Laboratory analysis again ruled out thyroid associated ophthalmopathy. Churg-Strauss syndrome, Wegener’s granulomatosis or Sjögren’s syndrome could be ruled out. A bone marrow trephine biopsy excluded systemic hematological disease as well. A biopsy was performed from the retrobulbar mass again, which confirmed the lymphoid hyperplasia with B-cell dominance. High dose methylprednisone and local irradiation resulted only moderate decrease of the mass, so systemic chemotherapy was started using CVP (cyclophosphamide, vincristin, prednisone) then CHOP (CVP + anthrycycline) polychemotherapy for eight cycles and subcutaneous interferon-α for 20 months. CONCLUSIONS - This resulted a complete regression of the disease, and the patient is well for 48 months now.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Case report of a woman with anti amphiphysin positive stiff person syndrome

MANHALTER Nóra, GYÖRFI Orsolya, BOROS Erzsébet, BOKOR Magdolna, FAZEKAS Ferenc, DÉNES Zoltán, FABÓ Dániel, KAMONDI Anita, ERÕSS Loránd

Stiff person syndrome is a rare neuroimmunological disease, characterized by severe, involuntary stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms, which are worsened by external stimuli. The classical form is associated with high levels of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase. One of the variant forms is associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. This entity is a paraneoplastic syndrome, caused primarily by breast cancer, secondarily by lung cancer. Symptomatic therapy of anti amphiphysin positive stiff person syndrome includes treatment with benzodiazepines and baclofen (including intrathecal baclofen therapy). The effect of immunological therapies is controversial. Treatment of the underlying cancer may be very effective. In this report, we describe a 68 year old female presenting with an unusally rapidly developing anti amphiphysin positive stiff person syndrome, which was associated with breast cancer. Her painful spasms abolished after intrathecal baclofen treatment was initiated. Her condition improved spontaneously and significantly after cancer treatment, which enabled to start her complex rehabilitation and the simultaneous dose reduction of the intrathecal baclofen. The bedridden patient improved to using a rollator walker and the baclofen pump could be removed 18 monthes after breast surgery. This highlights the importance of cancer screening and treatment in anti amphiphysin positive stiff person syndrome cases.

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[Fulvestrant and bisphosphonate therapy of breast cancer with osseal metastases]

KLINKÓ Tímea, GALLER Zoltán, LANDHERR László

Clinical Oncology

[Clinical role of multigenic prognostic tests in breast cancer therapy]

GYŐRFFY Balázs

[Current clinical practice for breast cancer originates in “evidence based medicine”. In this, each tumor receives a therapy optimal for a given patient population - which might not be optimal for each individual patient. Multigenic tests determining expression of a set of genes can provide additional support in this decision process. Two such tests (MammaPrint and Prosigna) have already received FDA clearance. A number of additional test are commercially available (IHC4, Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, BCI). A common property of these assays is their utility in estrogen receptor positive early breast cancer. The main clinical problem answered by them is the necessity of adjuvant chemotherapy. To date, no reliable algorithm has been identifi ed capable to pinpoint the most effective chemotherapy combination for a given patient. Furthermore, there is no trustworthy test for triple negative breast cancer. The assays utilize different technologies (immunohistochemistry, gene chips, RT-PCR) and a discrepant list of genes - these result in discordance of the predictions for the individual patient. Despite these shortcomings, multigenic tests quickly gained foothold in breast cancer therapy decision process. Their utility is supported by the cost reduction for the health care providers by lowering the number of patients eligible for chemotherapy.]