Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS, 2005]

FEBRUARY 15, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(01)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Information synthesis in health care]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső

Hungarian Radiology

[2005, International Year of Physics]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Éva Kis (editor): Cases of Pediatric Radiology]

MOHAI Gabriella

Hungarian Radiology

[Esophageal diverticula in mixed connective tissue disease]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella, DITRÓI Edit

[INTRODUCTION - The functional and morphological changes of oesophagus occur in two third of mixed connective tissue disease patients according to the literature. CASE REPORT - We report three cases of 27, 39 and 48 year old women suffering of lateral pharyngoesophageal, epibronchial and epiphrenic diverticula associated with connective tissue disease. Diverticula had an average diameter of 3.8 cm (maximal diameters: 7.2-8 cm). The esophageal pouches produced dysphagia, dystonia, motility disorders, food stagnation and vomiting, retrosternal burning sensation and tachyarrythmia after 5-16 month's latency period. In one patient pneumoesophagus also evolved. The high serum enzyme levels and proximal electromyogram proved the presence of polymyositis. CONCLUSION - The localization, number and the size of esophageal diverticula are determined by the interstitial myopathy.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Remembrance of Béla Wald]

EMED Alexander

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

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Association of anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung

DENIZ Ersay Fatih, SENAYLI Atilla, BICAKCI Ünal

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

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[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

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The timing of weaning alters the vulnerability to stress-induced gastric erosion in adult rats

LUDMILA Filaretova, LUDMILA Vataeva, ZELENA Dóra

Background - Weaning is an important period of life and its timing may influence the resilence for later stress. One of the most important stress-related disorder is gastric ulceration. Purpose and methods - Therefore we aimed to investigate the sensitivity of gastric mucosa to cold (at 16°C) water immersion stress (WIS for 3h) in adult (75-day-old) female and male rats after weaning them at different timepoints (at 17, 21, 30, 36 or 42 postnatal days). The connection with stress was studied by comparing control groups to those underwent WIS at the time of weaning and measuring corticosterone levels at the time of collecting the stomach samples. Results - The timing of weaning has strong impact on all studied parameters. Stress-induced erosion development was the smallest in rats weaned at 36-day independently from preconditioning with WIS at weaning, or sex, despite a clear sex-effect on blood corticosterone levels and body weight. WIS at weaning influenced only the body weight in adult rats weaned at 30-day, being higher in stressed than in control groups. There was no clear overall correlation between erosion area and blood corticosterone measures. Conclusions - Taken together our results confirm that the timing of weaning has long-lasting impact on the resiliance of gastric mucosa to ulcerogenic stressful events. In rats the postnatal day 30-36 seems to be optimal for weaning in both sexes as both earlier and later weaning increased vulnerability. Females seems to be more vulnerable to the effect of weaning than males.