Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS, 2005]

JUNE 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(03)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Stable, since it is changing]

KUHN Endre

Hungarian Radiology

[Entertainment ultrasound]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[Imre Lélek Memorial Conference - 7th Conference on Ultrasound and Diagnostic Imaging]

FARBAKY Zsófia

Hungarian Radiology

[Prevention of thrombotic complications in vascular interventional procedures]

HORVÁTH László, BATTYÁNY István, ROSTÁS Tamás, HARMAT Zoltán, BODROGI Gabriella, RADICS Éva

[Procedures of vascular interventional radiology is linked inevitably a certain amount of risk of thrombotic complications, like intimal and vascular wall injuries, increased thrombotic risk caused by the catheter itself, etc. The first approach of thrombotic prevention was achieved by acetyl salicylic acid in case of peripheral arteries, this treatment was later replaced by long-term anticoagulation. Opportunities were provided by the recognition of risky blood characteristics in relation to thrombotic complications. Consequently, a well performed preparation and premedication of the patients could reasonably decrease the risk. The most important steps are the cessation of smoking, normalization of hemoconcentration and antithrombotic premedication. Better understanding of the nature of atherosclerotic progression led to the introduction of long-term fibrinolytic inhibition therapy. In the past decades beside patients with vascular stenosis, the oncology patients are also treated by different radiological interventions, like intraarterial chemotherapy and chemoembolization. The use of several-day-long infusion represent a new challenge, the treated vessels, the lumen and the surface of the catheter must be prevented of thrombosis. For this purpose a few suitable drugs can be applied with mild anticoagulant and fibrinolytic stimulating effect. We use the sodium pentosan polysulphate.]

Hungarian Radiology

[General Assembly of the Association of the Hungarian Radiographers]

FEHÉR Lászlóné

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Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

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DENIZ Ersay Fatih, SENAYLI Atilla, BICAKCI Ünal

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

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Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS 2003]