Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS]

MARCH 22, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(01-02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Use of covered stents in the endovascular treatment of extracranial stenosis of the internal carotid artery]

SZÓLICS Alex, VÖRÖS Erika, SZTRIHA László, SZIKRA Péter, SZÓLICS Miklós, PALKÓ András

[INTRODUCTION - Significant stenosis of the internal carotid artery is frequently treated with stent placement. With growing clinical experience and usage of finer instrumentation, the incidence of periprocedural complications have reduced in larger centers. Two-thirds of the complications are postprocedural, due to the embolisation through the stent structure. Covered stents seem to be a good option against such embolisation. Our study demonstrates the efficiency, safety and feasibility of covered stent grafts, and the long term outcome of patients who underwent endovascular treatment of extracranial internal carotid artery stenoses, caused by highly embologenic plaques. MATERIALS AND METHODS - Between 2002 and 2003, 30 patients (22 male, 8 female, aged 50-89yrs, mean: 66 yrs) with 30 internal carotid artery stenoses having ipsilateral symptoms and/or stenotic lesions caused by irregular or ulcerated soft plaques or restenosis were treated with self-expanding covered stents (Symbiot, Boston Scientific). Predilatation and protecting devices were not used. Postdilatation was applied in every patient. Mean followup was 60 months (range 57-66 months), by Doppler ultrasonography as well as clinical examination. RESULTS - The degree of stenosis was found to range from 70% to subtotal occlusion. The plaque surfaces were irregular or ulcerated in 70%. The stenotic lesions were up to 30 mm in length. The narrowing of the internal carotid artery never extended to the common carotid artery. The technical success rate of stenting was 100%. The stents could be positioned with an accuracy of 2-3 mm. Periprocedurally, there were no neurological complications or deaths. During follow-up no strokes or stroke-related deaths occurred. Restenosis was found in two patients (6,6%) who underwent successful balloon dilatation. CONCLUSION - Our experience indicates that the covered stent is an efficient periprocedural and postprocedural “protecting device” to prevent neurological complications due to embolizations caused by high-risk plaques in stenotic lesions of extracranial internal carotid artery.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Dr. Miklós Kéki]

NAGY Gyöngyi

Hungarian Radiology

[Lányi Márton prize, 2007 - The winner: dr. Milics Margit]

GÖBLYÖS Péter

Hungarian Radiology

[Analysis of the status of the Hungarian radiologists in 2007]

KIS Zsuzsanna, LOMBAY Béla

[INTRODUCTION - It can be often heard that the number of practicing radiologists is constantly reducing, and that the specialty is growing “old”. Also, it is believed that the ratio of women to men radiologists is unfavorable. MATERIAL AND METHOD - The authors’ study was based on the data available with the Hungarian Medical Chamber, and was complemented with the data from the observatory network of the specialty. They have established the number of doctors working in the radiological departments in all counties of Hungary, including Budapest, in 2007. They also evaluated the type of workload the doctors faced and the type of replacements in the "pipeline". RESULTS - There were 1151 radiologists on the register in 2007. Out of 1151, 1099 (95,5%) worked here in Hungary and 52 (4,5%) worked overseas. Number of active radiologists in 2007 was 620 (64%). There were 346 (36%) radiologists working after their retirement. Number of radiologists in-training was 133 (12%). Ratio of female to male was 71 vs. 29%. CONCLUSION - On the basis of the data available the ratio of female to male doctors proved really unfavorable. There were few radiologists in-training, besides a large population of radiologists working post-retirement. The radiologists are over-burdened, and the geographical distribution is inappropriate.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Sessions, 2007 year performance and 2008 year plans of the Hungarian College of Radiologists]

PALKÓ András

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

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Association of anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung

DENIZ Ersay Fatih, SENAYLI Atilla, BICAKCI Ünal

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

Hungarian Radiology

[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza

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[70th Anniversary of the Greek Radiological Society]

LOMBAY Béla

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[CONGRESS CALENDAR]