Hungarian Radiology

[Board Meeting of the Hungarian College of Radiology]

PALKÓ András, FORRAI Gábor

OCTOBER 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

[X. National Congress of the Association of Hungarian Radiographers]

MALÉTA Andrea

Hungarian Radiology

[The role of MRI in the clinical examination following breast cancer screening]

SZABÓ Éva, BIDLEK Mária, GŐDÉNY Mária

[INTRODUCTION - Breast cancer screening was performed in 27 325 female patients at the National Institute of Oncology from 1st of January 2002 to May 30th of 2005. Complementary examinations were necessary in 1876 women. MR-mammography was performed in 65 of these cases. We were curious about in which cases MR mammography helps to make the diagnosis more accurate, how does it influence the therapy. We also studied, whether the number of surgical interventions because of benign breast lesions decreases due to MR mammography. PATIENTS AND METHODS - In 65 patients MR mammography was performed using non-contrast axial and coronal T1W and STIR sequences. After the injection of gadolinium four series of 3D FLASH (fast low angle shot) dynamic gradiens echo sequences were also applied. Subtraction of the non-contrast and contrast enhanced series were evaluated in addition to the intensity curves of the postcontrast series. RESULTS - MR mammography helped to evaluate dense breasts in 21 cases, to identify multifocal lesions in 6 cases and to differentiate the malignant-benign processes. In the course of the 65 post-screening examinations, malignant processes [BI-RADS IV-V (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System)] were diagnosed in 21 cases, benign processes (BI-RADS II-III) or negative results were found in 44 patients. CONCLUSION - MR mammography increased diagnostic accuracy, decreased the number of benign lesion-related surgical procedures and increased the accuracy in determining surgical radicality and establishing a therapeutic plan.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Forum of Young Radiologists]

SOMOGYI Rita

Hungarian Radiology

[Acromesomelic dysplasia du Pan]

ALI Al Kaissi, MAHER Ben Ghachem, FARID Ben Chehida, KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski

[INTRODUCTION - Cartilage derived morphogenic protein (CDMP1) mutations account for several related disorders, ranging from prenatal lethal to very mild entities such as brachydactyly C. Two similar severe manifestations of CDMP1 mutations are du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndromes. CASE REPORTS - We report two second degree relatives with du Pan syndrome. Clinical history and full skeletal surveys were analysed and compared with the data from the literature. Frequent spontaneous abortions - probably manifestation of the lethal forms of CDMP1 mutations - were present in both families. Skeletal surveys of the patients showed similar acromesomelic abnormalities consistent with du Pan syndrome. CONCLUSION - The rare publications of du Pan syndrome present usually insufficient radiographic documentation. Better radiographic imaging is necessary to establish clear-cut criteria of differentiation between du Pan and Hunter-Thompson syndrome.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Calcification of the tentorium cerebelli]

BILONKA Viola, BENDE Mariann

[A 16-year-old female patient with high temperature and headache was hospitalized because of suspicion of meningitis. Cranial CT showed a mild hydrocephalus, massive falx calcification and calcification in the projection of the tentorium. Excluding several well known reasons of the calcification the findings was thought to be a physiological variation. The child recovered after some days and left the hospital. The authors based on prior publications on tentorium calcification consider this finding a physiological-phylogenetic origin.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE PSYCHO-SOCIAL BACKGROUND FACTORS OF INDUCED ABORTIONS BASED ON A REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL SURVEY]

GYŐRFFY Zsuzsa, LŐRINCZ Jenő, ÁDÁM Szilvia, KOPP Mária

[INTRODUCTION - In Hungary the number of induced abortions is three times higher than in European Union countries. The exploration of the bio-psycho-social factors in the background of abortions may serve as an instrument to develop effective prevention. METHODS - The Hungarostudy 2002 national representative study included 12,634 interviewed subjects. The sample represents the Hungarian population above the age of 18, according to gender, age and geographical location. The aim of the health survey was to analyse the physical and psychological status of the Hungarian population as well as the psychosocial risk factors. The prevalence of abortion in the female sub-sample was 22%. We analysed the background factors of abortion with the help of a statistical analysis. RESULTS - The risk factors behind abortions can be grouped as: physical abuse on behalf of partners and/or parents, attachment disorder and early traumatisation, lack of social support, low financial status and inadequate social environment. These factors have all shown significant connection to abortions. Suicide attempts and suicidal thoughts, high Beck Depression (BDI) scores, smoking and alcohol consumption are also significant among those who had abortions. CONCLUSION - An important aim of the Hungarostudy 2002 survey and the follow-ups is to serve a more extensive and effective prevention by exploring the background factors of induced abortions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian adaptation of a short eating disorder questionnaire (SCOFF)]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, SIMON Dávid, VARGA Márta, SZABÓ Pál, TÚRY Ferenc, RATHNER Günther

[Aim - Eating disorders are becoming an increasingly relevant health issue, therefore the fast and accurate screening of people at risk is of great practical importance. The aim of SCOFF questionnaire is to assess this risk and the extent to which a person is affected, by using five simple yes or no questions. The objective of our study was to assess the validity of the Hungarian version of the test Methods - 777 medical students (210 men, 567 women, mean age 22.3±2.33 years) participated in the survey. The online questionnaire contained anthropometric data, the Eating Behaviour Severity Scale and, beside the SCOFF, the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Results - The SCOFF is excellent at screening clinical eating disorders. Its sensitivity was 100% and specificity 85.1%. It is less efficient at detecting subclinical cases, but it does not show worse results than EDI. According to the data SCOFF is better at identifying more serious cases. Applying on the same sample SCOFF had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than EDI. Discussion - SCOFF is suitable for primary screening of eating disorders with a non-diagnostic purpose, taken two “yes” answers out of five as the critical margin, specified by the authors.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 32nd General Assembly and Postgraduate Training Course of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology]