Hungarian Radiology

[Beginning of a new section: Pathology without borders - Integrative medical papers]

LOMBAY Béla

JULY 15, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Can magnetic resonance imaging play a role in planning the method of delivery after Caesarean section?]

GERGELY István, CSÉCSEI Károly, DORFFNER Roland, BARANYAI Tibor

[INTRODUCTION - The number of Caesarean sections has been dramatically increasing worldwide, and also in Hungary in the last decade. In case of pregnancy following a preliminary Caesarean section it is always questioned if repeated Caesarean section or vaginal birth is required. The authors try to draw a conclusion from the thickness and the structure of the uterinal scar. The aim of the current study is to assess the additional role of uterinal MR examination undertaken between two births. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During our retrospective preliminary study T2 weighted sagittal images of uterinal MR examinations of 13 female patients were analysed. The presence of scar line was evaluated for thickness (millimetres, mm). This measurement was compared with the surgical report following consequent Caesarean section. Thus, a correlation was made between the surgical scar found at the repeated Caesarean section and the structure of the uterine scar seen by MR examination (between two births) which could play a role in the indication of the next birth. RESULTS - Three of our 13 patients gave birth via vagina (VBAC), and 10 via repeated Caesarean sections. According to the descriptions of the surgical scar the scars thinned out in six cases, whereas they made thickness in four. According to the appearance of the place of incision the scar was homogeneous and hypointens in nine cases, and inhomogeneous but basically hypointense in one case. According to the description of surgery in the MR examination the thinned out scar was thinner than 6 mm in 4 cases, and thicker than 6 mm in two cases. According to the description of surgery in the MR examination the nonthinned out scar was thinner than 6 mm in three cases, and thicker than 6 mm in one case. In two patients of three who gave birth via vagina the scar was thicker than 6 mm in the MR examination, and thinner than 6 mm in one case, the MR appearance of the scar was homogeneous and hypointens in two cases and complied with the original zonal anatomy in one case. CONCLUSION - In case repeated Caesarean section is not necessary from the aspect of the foetus or the mother, uterinal MR examination is of an additional significance in the complex indication of birth following a previous Caesarean section. The thickness, structure and signal intensity of the uterinal scar may provide a useful additional information.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Balloon dilatation and metallic stent placement in inferior vena cava stenosis complicating liver transplantation]

DOROS Attila, NÉMETH Andrea, HARTMANN Erika, DEÁK Pál Ákos, FEHÉRVÁRI Imre, TÓTH Szabolcs, NEMES Balázs, KÓBORI László

[INTRODUCTION - The only successful therapy for end stage liver cirrhosis is liver transplantation. The anastomotic stenosis of the inferior vena cava is rare but serious complication. In these cases surgery is a high risk procedure; therefore interventional radiological methods are recommended. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Eleven patients developed 12 caval stenosis from 365 liver transplant recipients in Budapest. One of the patients had caval stenosis again after retransplantation. Dilatation was performed with 10- 25 mm large balloon catheters in 6 cases and 6 metallic stents (12-24 mm in diameter) were implanted. All the procedures were performed via the common femoral vein. RESULTS - The success of the intervention was measured by the morphological results, clinical signs and by the changes of superior-inferior vena cava pressure gradients. Before the intervention 14 Hgmm mean pressure gradient was measured, which decreased to 8 Hgmm post intervention. Eleven patients developed renal insufficiency before treatment; this was reversible in 6 cases. One patient had impaired renal function before treatment, and later on again, after retransplantation. Three of 4 patients with renal insufficiency died in the post operative period. One stent migration was noticed prompting surgical fixation of the stent. CONCLUSION - Inferior vena cava stenosis represents a serious complication after liver transplantation, causing ascites, hydrothorax and venous congestion in the kidneys and the liver. In the critical post operative period surgery is not recommended, risking the viability of the liver and the life of the patient. Interventional radiology with balloon dilatation and stent implantation is the method of choice in these cases, primary stenting with large self expanding metallic stents is necessary in elastic stenosis caused by torsion of the anastomosis.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Mediastinal hamartoma in childhood]

KISS Regina Judit, VERES Lukács

[INTRODUCTION - Mediastinal hamartoma is a rare entity in children. Exact diagnosis can be given virtually only after surgical exploration, which is also the ultimate choice of treatment due to its benign nature. CASE REPORT - A 4-year-old boy with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and pneumonias, had a huge tumour mass in his left upper lung lobe, which infiltrated the mediastinum. After a negative bronchoscopy and an unsuccessful CT-guided biopsy, surgery was performed. The final histological result revealed the mass to be mediastinal hamartoma. CONCLUSION - Mediastinal masses are relatively common in childhood, but mediastinal hamartoma is rare, and its preoperative diagnosis appears to be difficult.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Monteggia fracture]

SHAIKH Shoaib, LOMBAY Béla, KISS Ákos

[The Monteggia fracture is a very challenging injury, not only for the treating surgeon but also for the radiologist. The correct and timely identification of the injury is vital for a favourable outcome. Following is an overview of the Monteggia fracture.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Galeazzi fracture in childhood]

LOMBAY Béla

[The Galeazzi fracture dislocation is a fracture of the distal radius with dislocation of the distal radio-ulnar joint. In 1934 Galeazzi an Italian surgeon published an article with his experiences of this injury pattern. Although the Galeazzi fracture - dislocation is a well known injury with characteristic clinical and X-ray signs we couldn’t find any article in the literature about the differentiation of different types of this injury. Our experiences showed that there are three characteristic types seeing on the plan film: 1. extension type: radial shaft fracture with dorsal angle and ulnar dislocation in volar direction; 2. flexion type: radial shaft fracture with volar angle and ulnar dislocation of dorsal in direction; 3. abduction type: radial shaft fracture with radial angle and ulnar dislocation in ulnar direction. The three types were published in a Hungarian textbook in 1987.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Focus on Lege Artis Medicinae (LAM)]

VASAS Lívia, GEGES József

[Three decades ago, LAM was launched with the goal of providing scientific information about medicine and its frontiers. From the very beginning, LAM has also concerned a special subject area while connecting medicine with the world of art. In the palette of medical articles, it remained a special feature to this day. The analysis of the history of LAM to date was performed using internationally accepted publication guidelines and scientific databases as a pledge of objectivity. We examined the practice of LAM if it meets the main criteria, the professional expectations of our days, when publishing contents of the traditional printed edition and its electronic version. We explored the visibility of articles in the largest bibliographic and scientific metric databases, and reviewed the LAM's place among the Hun­ga­rian professional journals. Our results show that in recent years LAM has gained international reputation des­pite publishing in Hungarian spoken by a few people. This is due to articles with foreign co-authors as well as references to LAM in articles written exclusively by foreign researchers. The journal is of course full readable in the Hungarian bibliographic databases, and its popularity is among the leading ones. The great virtue of the journal is the wide spectrum of the authors' affiliation, with which they cover almost completely the Hungarian health care institutional sys­tem. The special feature of its columns is enhanced by the publication of writings on art, which may increase Hungarian and foreign interest like that of medical articles.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.