Hungarian Radiology

[Atypical Cyst or Something Else?]

KÁLMÁN Gabriella1, BOGDÁN László1, FOK Éva2, BOGNER Barna3, DÉNES László1

JUNE 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(03)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Mohácsi Városi Kórház, Röntgenosztály, Mohács
  2. Állatorvostudományi Egyetem, Helmintológiai Tanszék, Budapest
  3. Baranya Megyei Kórház, Patológiai és Citológiai Laboratórium, Pécs

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

[LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders]

SOÓS Zsuzsanna, SALAMON Mónika, ERDEI Katalin, KASZÁS Nóra, FOLYOVICH András, SZŰCS Anna, BARCS Gábor, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, SKALICZKI József, VADASDI Károly, WINKLER Gábor

[Celiac disease - in its typical form - is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.]

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[NON-INVASIVE CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY BY MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY]

PRÉDA István, KERECSEN Gábor, MAUROVICH-HORVAT Pál

[This review summarizes the diagnostic spectrum, ways of application and methodological difficulties of multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) coronary angiography. The non-invasive assessment of cardiac and coronary anatomy is now possible with computed tomographic coronary angiography using the modern 16 to 64-slice technology. This technique finds its main use today in the screening of patients with moderate probability of having coronary artery disease (atypical chest pain). Its negative predictive value varies between 97% and 99%, thus, a negative result of this non-invasive outpatient procedure can reduce the possibility of coronary artery disease to the minimum. Other important diagnostic applications include the follow-up of patients with coronary artery bypass, accurate diagnosis of coronary artery anomalies, and the simultaneous examination of the heart and great vessels. The future development of the technique is directed to coronary plaque characterization, particularly the detection of vulnerable plaques. The radiation exposure is relatively low (7-13 mSv), comparable with that of invasive coronary angiography.]

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[VITAMIN D TREATMENT: HORMONE THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WHO NEED IT OR SIMPLY A SUPPLEMENTATION FOR EVERYONE?]

SPEER Gábor

[Various medical associations issue different recommendations for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. These significant differences are partly explained by the different definition of normal vitamin D level and the use of completely different mathematical models to predict the increase in vitamin D level as a response to therapy. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the target vitamin D level is 20 ng/ml, whereas the Endocrine Society (ES) recommends 30 ng/m as the miminum target value. According to the ES, a 1 ng/ml increase of vitamin D level can be reached by a daily intake of 100 NE, while the IOM recommends 3.6 ng/ml. Moreover, the IOM states that the effect of therapy on serum level is nonlinear. These differences show that the ES and IOM have different views on the risk of adverse effects. The IOM recommends 400 IU vitamin D daily for children younger than 1 year, 800 IU for those above 70 years and 600 IU/per day for everyone else. The ES recommend 400-1000 IU daily for all infants and 1500- 2000 IU for adults. Screening, however, is not recommended by either society. To decrease uncertainty concerning the side effects of higher-dose vitamin D treatment, it is important to understand, use and support the function of the pharmacovigilance system of the pharmaceutical industry that manufactures and markets various (prescription, over-the-counter) preparations. This is what the author aims to highlight in the second part of this article. Using this system, both the doctor and the patient can help support and accept the justification of higher-dose vitamin D therapy.]

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NMDA-receptor associated encephalitis in a woman with mature cystic ovarian teratoma

VANYA Melinda, FÜVESI Judit, KOVÁCS A. Zoltán, GORGORAPTIS Nikos, SALEK-HADDADI Afram, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ, BÁRTFAI György

Introduction - N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) antibody-associated encephalitis has been reported in the international neurological literature to be associated with mature or immature ovarian teratomas (OTs). However, few cases of encephalitis were diagnosed in Hungary. In 2011 Hollody et al. described the first case of anti-NMDA receptor associated encephalitis in Hungary. Objective - Our aim was to present a case of NMDA-R antibody-mediated encephalitis in a woman with OT thereby providing information facilitating diagnosis of OT in women, who present with symptoms of encephalitis. Case - We report the case of a 25 year-old women, who developed NMDA-R -antibody associated autoimmune encephalitis and who displayed confusion, disorientation, a behavioural disturbance with agitation and features of paranoia and at least one reported generalized tonic clonic seizure and orofacial dyskinesia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a functional ovarian cyst measuring 3.3 cm, which was removed surgically and demonstrated histologically to be a mature cystic OT. The serum was positive for antibodies to NMDA receptors. Following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, oophorectomy and a 5-day course of plasma exchange, followed by corticosteroid and azathioprine immunosuppressive therapy, the patient displayed a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion - Cystic teratomas are common benign ovarian lesions in women of reproductive age. Although the association of OTs and NMDA-R antibody-associated encephalitis has been described in the international neurological literature, this relationship needs to be considered from on the interdisciplinary aspect by the health care providers.