Hungarian Radiology

[Analysis of the status of the Hungarian radiologists in 2007]

KIS Zsuzsanna, LOMBAY Béla

MARCH 22, 2008

Hungarian Radiology - 2008;82(01-02)

[INTRODUCTION - It can be often heard that the number of practicing radiologists is constantly reducing, and that the specialty is growing “old”. Also, it is believed that the ratio of women to men radiologists is unfavorable. MATERIAL AND METHOD - The authors’ study was based on the data available with the Hungarian Medical Chamber, and was complemented with the data from the observatory network of the specialty. They have established the number of doctors working in the radiological departments in all counties of Hungary, including Budapest, in 2007. They also evaluated the type of workload the doctors faced and the type of replacements in the "pipeline". RESULTS - There were 1151 radiologists on the register in 2007. Out of 1151, 1099 (95,5%) worked here in Hungary and 52 (4,5%) worked overseas. Number of active radiologists in 2007 was 620 (64%). There were 346 (36%) radiologists working after their retirement. Number of radiologists in-training was 133 (12%). Ratio of female to male was 71 vs. 29%. CONCLUSION - On the basis of the data available the ratio of female to male doctors proved really unfavorable. There were few radiologists in-training, besides a large population of radiologists working post-retirement. The radiologists are over-burdened, and the geographical distribution is inappropriate.]

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