Hungarian Radiology

[A true European radiologist - Interview with professor Gabriel Paul Krestin]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

OCTOBER 20, 2004

Hungarian Radiology - 2004;78(05)

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Hungarian Radiology

[In vitro optimization of sequences applicable for the MR examination of the gastrointestinal tract with respect to certain contrast materials]

BABOS Magor, PALKÓ András, KARDOS Lilla, CSERNAY László

[PURPOSE - Optimization of gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences in order to visualize oral contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel using a 1-T unit. MATERIAL AND METHODS - Authors investigated the optimal appearance of four different potential oral contrast media (rosehip syrup, blackcurrant extract, iron(III)-desferrioxamine, cocoa) with different spin-echo and gradientecho sequences using a simple plastic model. They were searching the optimal solution by changing the parameters of the chosen sequences keeping an eye in every case on the signal-to-noise ratio, the contrast, the resolution, the artifacts and the signal intensity of the contrast materials. RESULTS - The gradient-echo sequences are suitable for imaging of the small bowel. Too short echo time should be avoided because of the increased formation of artifacts. A lot of artifacts can be eliminated using fat saturation. T2*- weighted gradient-echo sequences provide good appearance for the cocoa drink, as well as the three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence. The use of sequential gradientecho acquisition methods is advisable only in non-cooperating patients, because of their low signal-to-noise ratio. The iron(III)-desferrioxamine solution, the rosehip syrup and the blackcurrant extract are potential positive contrast agents on T1-weighted sequences. On the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence the rosehip syrup and the blackcurrant extract appear as negative contrast materials. CONCLUSIONS - Authors could select and optimize the sequences suitable for each contrast material and effective in small bowel MRI. The substances used in their experimental model are not harmful for humans when administered orally, so determination of additives is the only problem remained before their use in the clinical practice.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Pelvic computed tomography in staging of prostate cancer before surgery]

BERCZI Csaba, TÓTH György, VARGA Attila, FLASKÓ Tibor, KOLLÁR József, TÓTH Csaba

[PURPOSE - The aim of the study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of computed tomography for local staging in patients underwent radical perineal prostatectomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 160 patients were involved in the study. Rectal digital examination, measurement of prostate specific antigen, prostate biopsy, CT, ultrasound, chest X-ray examination and bone scintigraphy were performed in every case before radical prostatectomy. RESULTS - The average preoperative prostate specific antigen concentration was 15.8 ng/ml before surgery. The average Gleason score of biopsies was 3.19. CT showed extraprostatic infiltration in 14 patients (pericapsular invasion n: 6, seminal vesicula n: 3, bladder infiltration n: 5, lymph node metastasis n: 2). The histological examination proved extraprostatic invasion of the tumour in 35 cases (pericapsular invasion n: 35, seminal vesicula n: 25, bladder infiltration n: 5). The cancer was localized in the prostate in 125 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for pericapsular invasion were 14% and 98%, for infiltration of seminal vesicula 12% and 100%, and for bladder infiltration 20% and 97%. There was not a significant difference between the prostate specific antigen values (p=0.94) in cases when the tumour was confined to the prostate and when the cancer showed extraprostatic infiltration. There was significant difference between the Gleason score values between the two groups (p=0.008). CONCLUSION - The sensitivity of CT for local spread of prostate cancer is very low, thus CT is not a suitable method for the local staging before surgery.]

Hungarian Radiology

[PACS-seeing in Nancy - Study-tour, September, 2004]

FORRAI Gábor, BARTA Miklós

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiation protection belongs to patient’s right]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső

Hungarian Radiology

[Breast cancer screening in Hold street started twenty five years ago]

GÖBLYÖS Péter, TANKA Ida, GRÉGER Judit

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KAPRONCZAY Katalin

[Hungarian professional periodicals started quite late in European context. Their publish­ing, editing and editorial philosophy were equally influenced by specific historical and political situations. Certain breaking points of history resulted in termina­tion of professional journals (War of In­de­pendence 1848-1849, First and Se­cond World Wars), however there were pe­riods, which instigated the progress of sciences and founding of new scientific journals. Both trends were apparent in years after the fall of former Hungarian regime in 1990. The structure of book and journal publishing has changed substantially, some publishers fell “victim” others started successfully as well. The latters include the then-established publishing house Literatura Medica and its own scientific journal, Lege Artis Me­di­cinae (according to its subtitle: New Hun­garian Medical Herald) issued first in 1990. Its appearance enhanced significantly the medical press market. Its scientific publications compete with articles of the well-established domestic medical journals however its philosophy set brand-new trends on the market. Concerning the medical community, it takes on its problems and provides a forum for them. These problems are emerging questions in health care, economy and prevention, in close interrelation with system of public health institutions, infrastructure and situation of those providing individual health services. In all of them, Lege Artis Medicinae follows consequently the ideas of traditional social medicine.]

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[The importance of patient reported outcome measures in Pompe disease]

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[In recent decades it has become increasingly important to involve patients in their diagnostic and treatment process to improve treatment outcomes and optimize compliance. By their involvement, patients can become active participants in therapeutic developments and their observations can be utilized in determining the unmet needs and priorities in clinical research. This is especially true in rare diseases such as Pompe disease. Pompe disease is a genetically determined lysosomal storage disease featuring severe limb-girdle and axial muscle weakness accompanied with respiratory insufficiency, in which enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) now has been available for 15 years. In our present study, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for individuals affected with Pompe disease were developed which included questionnaires assessing general quality of life (EuroQoL, EQ-5D, SF36), daily activities and motor performance (Fatigue Severity Score, R-PAct-Scale, Rotterdam and Bartel disability scale). Data were collected for three subsequent years. The PROM questionnaires were a good complement to the physician-recorded condition assessment, and on certain aspects only PROMs provided information (e.g. fatigue in excess of patients’ objective muscle weakness; deteriorating social activities despite stagnant physical abilities; significant individual differences in certain domains). The psychological effects of disease burden were also reflected in PROMs. In addition to medical examination and certain endpoints monitored by physicians, patient perspectives need to be taken into account when assessing the effectiveness of new, innovative treatments. With involvement of patients, information can be obtained that might remain uncovered during regular medical visits, although it is essential in determining the directions and priorities of clinical research. For all orphan medicines we emphasize to include patients in a compulsory manner to obtain general and disease-specific multidimensional outcome measures and use them as a quality indicator to monitor treatment effectiveness.]

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[Disease burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and their caregivers]

PÉNTEK Márta, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit, SZŐNYI László Pál, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, PFLIEGLER György, MELEGH Béla, BONCZ Imre, BRODSZKY Valentin, BAJI Petra, SZEGEDI Márta, POGÁNY Gábor, GULÁCSI László

[Background and purpose - Data on the disease burden of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy are scarce in Hungary. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ and their caregivers’ health related quality of life and healthcare utilisations. Methods - A cross sectional survey was performed as part of the European BURQOL-RD project. The EQ-5D-5L and Barthel Index questionnaires were applied, health care utilisations and patients’ informal carers were surveyed. Results - One symptomatic female carer, 50 children (boys 94%) and six adult patients (five males) participated in the study, the latter two subgroups were included in the analysis. The average age was 9.7 (SD=4.6) and 24.3 (SD=9.8) years, respectively. Median age at time of diagnosis was three years. The average EQ-5D score among children and adults was 0.198 (SD=0.417) and 0.244 (SD=0.322), respectively, the Barthel Index was 57.6 (SD=29.9) and 53.0 (SD=36.5). Score of satisfaction with healthcare (10-point Likert-scale) was mean 5.3 (SD=2.1) and 5.3 (SD=2.9). 15 children were hospitalised in the past 12 months for mean 12.9 (SD=24.5) days. Two patients received help from professional carer. 25 children (mean age 11.1, SD=4.4 years) were helped/supervisied by principal informal carer (parent) for mean 90.1 (SD=44.4) hours/week and further family members helped in 21 cases. Correlation between EQ-5D and Barthel Index was strong and significant (0.731; p<0.01) as well as with informal care time (-0.770; p<0.01), but correlation with satisfaction with health care was not significant (EQ-5D: 0.241; Barthel Index: 0.219; informal care: -0.142). Conclusion - Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life of patients. Parents play outstanding role in the care of affected children. This study is the first in the Central and Eastern European region that provides quality of life data in this rare disease for further health economic studies.]

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Single-hole, ruptured parenchymal arteriovenous fistula of the mesencephalon: not known vascular malformation of the brain or a posthemorrhagic entity?

KULCSÁR Zsolt, MACHI Paolo, VARGAS Isabel Maria, SCHALLER Karl, LOVBLAD Olof Karl

The subtypes of brain arteriovenous malformations, with direct, single-hole fistulas without co-existing nidus are not described as existing entities inside the brain parenchyma but on the pial surface. True parenchymal arteriovenous malformations present with nidal structure, even if they are small, whereas surface lesions may present a direct fistulous configuration. In this case of midbrain haemorrhage a direct arteriovenous fistula was detected at the level of the red nucleus between a paramedian midbrain perforator artery and a paramedian parenchymal vein, with pseudo-aneurysm formation at the fistulous connection, without signs of adjacent nidus structure. The hypothesis whether a pre-existing arteriovenous fistula ruptured or a spontaneous haemorrhage has caused the fistulous connection is discussed.

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[Relationships between COVID-19 disease, nutritional status, and dysphagia, particularly in stroke patients ]

KOVÁCS Andrea, SZABÓ Pál Tamás, FOLYOVICH András

[The new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which causes the COVID-19 disease can lead to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It poses a serious challenge to the health care system, especially intensive care. Neurological patients, usually of advanced age and with a myriad of comorbidities, are at particular risk through the impact of the new coronavirus on their condition and nutritional capacity. Stroke is a leader in morbidity and mortality data, with a focus on dysphagia and its complications due to COVID-19 disease and acute cerebrovascular accident. In the acute phase of stroke, 30-50% of patients suffer from dysphagia, which still shows a prevalence of 10% six months later. Dysphagia results in decreased or insufficient fluid and nutrient uptake, supp­lemented by inactivity, leading to malnutrition and sarcopenia, which worsens overall condition, outcome, and rehabilitation efficiency. Screening and early detection of swallowing disorders is a fundamental issue in order to develop a personalized and timely-initiated nutritional therapy strategy. Nutritional therapy plays a key role in frequent intensive care due to COVID-19 disease, where it increases the chances of recovery and reduces the length of stay in the intensive care unit and mortality. This is especially true in critically ill patients requiring prolonged ventilation. In COVID-19 diagnosed patients, screening for dysphagia, bedside assessment, and instrumental examination, followed by swallowing rehabilitation, are of paramount importance. Stroke can also be a complication of the COVID-19 infection. Care for cerebrovascular patients has also adapted to the pandemic, “triazination” has become systemic, and dysphagia screening for stroke patients and nutritional therapy adapted to it have also shed new light. ]