Hungarian Radiology

[A small piece of renaissance]

LOMBAY Béla

APRIL 10, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[Radiological diagnostics of the pancreas neoplasms - Onco Update 2005]

FORRAI Gábor, BODOKY György

[Authors reviewed the recent results of pancreas tumour radiological diagnostics and the place of the imaging and interventional methods. Systematical review of the most recent articles were summarized (July 2003-December 2004) in the following subjects: the etiology and clinico-pathology, general diagnostic and therapeutical questions of early pancreatic neoplasms, abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, MR-cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound-guided cytology, percutaneous biopsy, positron emission tomography, positron emission tomography - computed tomography, special pancreatic tumours. Experiences about the pancreas diagnostic methods are accumulating year-to-year rapidly. Therefore the current examination algorithm is changing continuously. New diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are entering in the daily practice. These are the reasons why the up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radiologic diagnosis of the diseases of the pediatric gynecology]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán, LÓRÁND Ágnes, LOVAS Györgyi, HÉJJ Ildikó

[The basic examination of the pediatric pelvic organs is the transabdominal ultrasound which provides useful information about the anatomy and the pathological changes and in the vast majority of cases it is sufficient for treatment planning and to establish the diagnosis. Additional examinations are needed in case of complex developmental anomalies, in suspition of tumor, in staging and follow up examinations of tumors. Among the modern imaging methods the use of CT and MRI can be considered. The authors described the most frequent diseases in their practice and gave a brief overview on anatomical and physiological basics which is necessary for the exact interpretation of the examinations.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Early detection of adult femoral head necrosis]

PALKÓ András, GION Katalin

[Adult avascular femoral head necrosis is common in young adulthood, and in 80% of cases affects male patients. The disease is bilateral in 40-80 %, and it may take several years to develop on the contralateral side. Late diagnosis and lack of early therapy can cause progressive disease and finally movement restraint. The diagnosis in early stage is crucial for choosing the most effective strategy in therapy. It is important to be aware of pathogenesis, clinical course and the differential diagnostic options of the disease, and these should be associated to the diagnostic findings at different imaging modalities. Based on this concept, we conclude that MR examinaton is the method of choice for the early (reversible) stage assessment. MRI of the hip is also able to evaluate and follow up the healthy contralateral side without further strain.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Dudoenum obstruction caused by duodenal diaphragm]

RUDAS Gábor, SEKYRA Pavel, PUMBERGER Wolfgang, POVYSIL Brigitta

[INTRODUCTION - Duodenum obstruction is a rare gastrointestinal developmental anomaly. It may be complete or incomplete. The incomplete or intrinsic form is often caused by an intraluminal membrane or web duodenal stenosis. The passage is existed with the help of a small perforated lake. Clinically the leading sign is the vomiting. CASE REPORT - A three days old baby admitted because of vomiting. Abdominal X-Ray and US could not found any reason of vomiting but the gastrointestinal contrast series had diagnostic value. Surgery proved the radiological diagnosis. CONCLUSION - For the diagnosis the conventional XRay and ultrasound is not sufficient in every case, the gold standard is the gastrointestinal contrast examination.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Czech dysplasia metatarsal type]

KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski, IVO Marik, MARIKOVA Olga, DANA Zemkova, MIROSLAV Kuklik

[We report a further female patient with the recently described new bone disease, Czech dysplasia metatarsal type. Czech dysplasia metatarsal type (CDMT) is an autosomal dominant debilitating disorder. Its constant phenotypic trait is hypoplasia/ dysplasia of the 3rd and/or 4th toes. “Congenital hip dysplasia” or “hip disease” is commonly evoked in the family history. The clinical course may be severe, incapacitating the patients early in life, or progress slowly with increasing hip and spine pain. This girl's phenotype and radiographic findings are similar to the seven previously reported cases.]

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Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc, NAGY Zsuzsanna, HAHN Katalin, CSOMOR Judit, VADVÁRI Árpád, TOLVAJ Balázs, GELPI Ellen

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Tracing trace elements in mental functions]

JANKA Zoltán

[Trace elements are found in the living organism in small (trace) amounts and are mainly essential for living functions. Essential trace elements are in humans the chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), fluorine (F), iodine (I), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), and questionably the boron (B) and vanadium (V). According to the biopsychosocial concept, mental functions have biological underpinnings, therefore the impairment of certain neurochemical processes due to shortage of trace elements may have mental consequences. Scientific investigations indicate the putative role of trace element deficiency in psychiatric disorders such in depression (Zn, Cr, Se, Fe, Co, I), premenstrual dysphoria (Cr), schizophrenia (Zn, Se), cognitive deterioration/de­mentia (B, Zn, Fe, Mn, Co, V), mental retardation (I, Mo, Cu), binge-eating (Cr), autism (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Fe). At the same time, the excess quantity (chronic exposure, genetic error) of certain trace elements (Cu, Mn, Co, Cr, Fe, V) can also lead to mental disturbances (depression, anxiety, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction, insomnia). Lithium (Li), being efficacious in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder, is not declared officially as a trace element. Due to nutrition (drinking water, food) the serum Li level is about a thousand times less than that used in therapy. However, Li level in the red cells is lower as the membrane sodium-Li countertransport results in a Li efflux. Nevertheless, the possibility that Li is a trace element has emerged as studies indicate its potential efficacy in such a low concentration, since certain geographic regions show an inverse correlation between the Li level of drinking water and the suicide rate in that area. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Extraskeletal, intradural, non-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma. Case report

KOMÁROMY Hedvig, OTTÓFFY Gábor

Intracranial localization of Ewing’s sarcoma is considerably very rare. Herein, we present clinical and neuroimaging findings regarding a 4-year-old boy with intracranial Ewing’s sarcoma. He was born prematurely, suffered intraventricular haemorrhage, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus developed, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the newborn period. The patient endured re­gular follow ups, no signs of shunt malfunction nor increased intracranial pressure were observed. The last neuroima­ging examination was performed at 8 months of age. Upon reaching the age of 4 years, repeated vomiting and focal seizures began, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were detected. A brain MRI depicted a left frontoparietal space-occupying lesion infiltrating the superior sagittal sinus. The patient underwent a craniotomy resulting in the total excision of the tumour. The histological examination of the tissue revealed a small round blue cell tumour. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of EWSR1 gene translocation with FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). No additional metastases were detected during the staging examinations. The patient was treated in accordance to the EuroEwing 99 protocol. Today, ten years onward, the patient is tumour and seizure free and has a reasonably high quality of life.

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[Manifestations of COVID-19 in pregnancy]

TÖRÖK Marianna, VEZÉR Márton, ZUBEK László, KESZTHELYI Márton, VÁRBÍRÓ Szabolcs

[There are confirmed COVID-19 infections in Hungary since March 2020. This disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 was initially known not to impose special risk on pregnant women, but probably due to the increasing number of cases and the latest mutations, this is no longer true nowadays. Recent outcomes suggest that pregnancy increases the risk of hospital admission, invasive ventilation and death with higher odds of preterm birth and caesarean sec­tion. Seemingly, vertical infection occurs only in a small percentage of all cases. To our best knowledge, 7 expectant mothers lost their life in Hungary thus far due to COVID-19. However, further rigorous studies are needed for a more accurate understanding of pregnancy complica­tions.]

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Single-hole, ruptured parenchymal arteriovenous fistula of the mesencephalon: not known vascular malformation of the brain or a posthemorrhagic entity?

KULCSÁR Zsolt, MACHI Paolo, VARGAS Isabel Maria, SCHALLER Karl, LOVBLAD Olof Karl

The subtypes of brain arteriovenous malformations, with direct, single-hole fistulas without co-existing nidus are not described as existing entities inside the brain parenchyma but on the pial surface. True parenchymal arteriovenous malformations present with nidal structure, even if they are small, whereas surface lesions may present a direct fistulous configuration. In this case of midbrain haemorrhage a direct arteriovenous fistula was detected at the level of the red nucleus between a paramedian midbrain perforator artery and a paramedian parenchymal vein, with pseudo-aneurysm formation at the fistulous connection, without signs of adjacent nidus structure. The hypothesis whether a pre-existing arteriovenous fistula ruptured or a spontaneous haemorrhage has caused the fistulous connection is discussed.