Hungarian Radiology

[40th Congress of the European Association of Pediatric Radiology Genova, 2-6th June 2003.]

KIS Éva1

AUGUST 20, 2003

Hungarian Radiology - 2003;77(04)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, ÁOK I. Sz. Gyermekklinika, Budapest

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Further articles in this publication

Hungarian Radiology

[Our experiences with the use of phosphor plate X-ray system and PACS]

BARTA H. Miklós, BERENTEY Ernő, FORNET Béla, FORRAI Gábor

[In this study the experiences, the advantages and disadvantages of a full digital radiology department are presented. The conventional radiology and the spot films of gastroenterologic studies are exposed on phosphor plates since 1999 at our department. Two work-stations are used for making the reports and six viewing-stations are installed at distant departments. A central server organizes the data and pictures flow and the archive system consists of magnetooptical discs in a juke-box. The conventional X-ray methods are fully integrated in the system. The number of hardcopies is dramatically decreased. The clinicians may easily access the images on the viewingstations. Possibility of teleradiology and teleconsultation is integrated in the system. The quality of the examinations is improved and became uniform. The images of different methods (CT, fluoroscopy) are stored also in digital format. The disadvantages are the high cost of installation, a new workflow and reporting habits must be initiated. A problem of one element can cause the breakdown of the whole system. The new technics, the digital world forces us to develope and define new technical standards in order to obtain uniform quality.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Radial scar associated with lobular neoplasia in the breast]

ERDŐSI Éva, HERTELENDY Ágnes, GREXA Erzsébet, ANGA Béla, VARGA Zoltán

[INTRODUCTION - The authors are presenting the case of a 55-year-old female patient with breast abnormalities of unclear morphology. CASE REPORT - The lesion seen in the left breast was characteristic of radial scar in which, however, numerous, but not clearly benign microcalcifications were detected. During histological examination a radial scar associated with a small lobular neoplasia was diagnosed. However, these microcalcifications were not related to the malignancy. CONCLUSION - In radial scar extensive benign microcalcifications may develop. Nevertheless we should bear in mind that in 10-30% of cases this disorder can be associated with malignancy even without mammographic signs. The final diagnosis, however, should always be made on the basis of histological examination.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The congress of ESGAR was a success in Budapest]

MESTER Ádám

Hungarian Radiology

[Cheirospondyloenchondromatosis]

IGNYS Anna, MALGORZATA Krajewska-Walasek, MARIKOVA Olga, IVO Marik, KAZIMIERZ Kozlowski

[The term of cheirospondyloenchondromatosis (CHE) was coined by Spranger et al. This generalised, distinctive form of enchondromatosis is characterised by mild to moderate dwarfism, short hands and feet with beaded fingers, prominent large joints and frequently mental deficiency. Major radiographic features include generalised mild platyspondyly, generalised enchondromatosis with marked involvement of hands and feet and small ilia with eroded crests and acetabular roofs. We report three patients with this rare, severe form of enchondromatosis and stress some differences between our patients and the classical description of Spranger et al.]

Hungarian Radiology

[In memoriam Sándor Holbok]

BARSAI János, SOMORJAI Péter

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