Hungarian Radiology

[19th Sopron Ultrasound Days]

VARGA Tamás

DECEMBER 20, 2004

Hungarian Radiology - 2004;78(06)

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Hungarian Radiology

[CALENDAR OF RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS, 2005]

Hungarian Radiology

[The “other” Röntgen - Julius the composer]

HEINER Lajos

Hungarian Radiology

[A world champion radiologist - Sport success of Zsuzsanna Kis]

LOMBAY Béla

Hungarian Radiology

[Shrinking borders of our globalized world - Interwiew with Indian radiologist Nirvikar Dahiya]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

Hungarian Radiology

[Recent advances in the radiology of colon cancer - Onco Update 2004]

KOLLÁR Attila

[The recent literature of colon cancer imaging, colonic stenting and the interventional treatment of colorectal liver metastases is overviewed. The introduction of virtual colonoscopy in the diagnosis of colon cancer drew attention in the last years and it is one of the most rapidly developing method. Several new publications was published about CT and MR colonography in the past one and half year. Nowadays, beside the double contrast barium enema and the colonoscopy (as gold standard), CT and MR colonography plays more and more important role. These methods can be applied only with multislice CT and modern MR machines equipped with appropriate softwares. Since these equipments are available only in limited number in Hungary, these methods has not been used in the daily practice. Development of interventional methods, like stenting of obstructive colon tumor and the percutaneous and intraarterial interventional treatment of colorectal metastases play more and more important role in the therapy, as indicated in the literature.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Oncology

[Complications of infusion treatment with emphasis on extravasation of cytostatics]

HARISI Revekka

[The extravasation of cytostatics is the most signifi cant complication of infusion therapy in cancer treatment. Extravasation refers to the inadvertent infi ltration of cytostatic drugs into subcutaneous or subdermal tissues surrounding the intravenous or intraarterial administration site. According to literature data incidence estimates between 0,01-7%. Extravasated drugs are classifi ed according to their potential for causing damage as vesicant, irritant and nonvesicant. Knowledge of risk factors, the patientrelated and treatment-related ones is important to minimize the occurrence of extravasation. In order to reduce the risk of extravasation, the staff involved in the tumor infusion therapy must be specially trained to implement several preventive and therapeutical protocols. In 2012, ESMO-EONS has put together a new comprehensive treatment protocol on the topic of cytostatics extravasation. Protocol recommended that every oncological department, who administers chemotherapy have to have extravasation trained team and a standby extravasation kit. According to the new ESMO-EONS guideline subcutaneous corticoids are not recommended, anymore. In case of mechloretamine extravasation the recommendation is immediate subcutaneous injection of sodium thiosulfate. After extravasation of anthracyclines, mitomycin C and platin salts the best treatment opportunity is subcutan dimethyl sulfoxide administration. In case of anthracyclines’ extravasation intravenous dexrazoxane treatment is also effective. Hyaluronidase, injected into or under the skin, facilitates absorption of extravasated drugs because of increases connective tissue permeability, promotes the spreading and reduces the local concentration of the extravasated citostatic agents. Hyaluronidase might be effi cacious in preventing skin necrosis by extravasation due to vinca alkaloids. The treatment of unresolved tissue necrosis or pain lasting more than 10 days is surgical debridement. Because of the medical and juristic importance of the extravasation event, it is necessary to establish uniform guidelines for treatment of extravasation, in all Hungarian Oncological Centers.]

Clinical Neuroscience

A case with reversible neurotoxicity induced by metronidazole

EREN Fulya, ALDAN Ali Mehmet, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hatem Hakan, SOYSAL Aysun

Background - Metronidazole is a synthetic antibiotic, which has been commonly used for protozoal and anaerobic infections. It rarely causes dose - and duration - unrelated reversible neurotoxicity. It can induce hyperintense T2/FLAIR MRI lesions in several areas of the brain. Although the clinical status is catastrophic, it is completely reversible after discontinuation of the medicine. Case report - 36-year-old female patient who had recent brain abscess history was under treatment of metronidazole for 40 days. She admitted to Emergency Department with newly onset myalgia, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision and cerebellar signs. She had nystagmus in all directions of gaze, ataxia and incompetence in tandem walk. Bilateral hyperintense lesions in splenium of corpus callosum, mesencephalon and dentate nuclei were detected in T2/FLAIR MRI. Although lumbar puncture analysis was normal, her lesions were thought to be related to activation of the brain abscess and metronidazole was started to be given by intravenous way instead of oral. As lesions got bigger and clinical status got worse, metronidazole was stopped. After discontinuation of metronidazole, we detected a dramatic improvement in patient’s clinical status and MRI lesions reduced. Conclusion - Although metronidazole induced neurotoxicity is a very rare complication of the treatment, clinicians should be aware of this entity because its adverse effects are completely reversible after discontinuation of the treatment.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Treatment of pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis]

CSISZÉR Eszter, CSEKEŐ Attila

[INTRODUCTION - More and more children affected by cystic fibrosis reach adulthood. The frequency of complications, such as pneumothorax, increases parallel with the long disease course. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The treatment of 17 manifestations of pneumothorax in 10 young adult cystic fibrosis patients in our institute was analysed retrospectively. RESULTS - Depending on the extension of pneumothorax and the clinical state of the patients the first choice of the treatment was observation alone in 6 cases, insertion of pleuracan in 3 cases and tube thoracostomy in 8 cases. Due to ineffective suction, thoracotomy was necessary in 6 patients, bilaterally in 3 cases. CONCLUSION - The outcome of conservative treatment even in "small, circumscribed pneumothorax" cases of symptom-free patients is uncertain and risky. Insertion of a pleuracan is recommended only in urgent, life-threatening cases, but definitive result should not be expected. If possible, chest drainage should be chosen as the first procedure. After 5-7 days of ineffective chest suction, thoracotomy is mandatory. Recurrence of the pneumothorax is direct indication for surgery. Antibiotic treatment is suggested for the duration of drainage, as well as for the surgical procedure.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The role of static MR-urography in diagnostics of urinary obstruction]

KIS Zsuzsanna, FAZEKAS Péter, KULCSÁR Dániel, KÖTELES Márta, KOVÁCS Annamária, MAGYAR Klára

[INTRODUCTION - The idea and methodology of MRurography has just crystallized recently due to the development of technology. The traditional MRU technology means the strongly T2 weighted sequence, suitable for depicting stationary liquid spaces. Its use is independent of the functional status of the kidneys thus it is suitable for depicting dilatated ureters in case of nonfunctioning kidneys, too. Authors's aim was to define the role of sMRU in the diagnostics of obstructive urinary diseases. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 60 sMRU examinations were performed on 59 patients using a 1.5 T Siemens Symphony MR scanner in the CT-MR Laboratory of the Markhot Ferenc County Hospital between May 1, 2003 and October 31, 2005. The sMRU was performed with 2D T2 TSE sequence with angiographic character. In each case, the examinations were completed with conventional sequences in multiple planes. The role of gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MR urography in the same diseases was not studied. In 7 cases, low-dose thin slice CT examination was performed to reveal the precise cause of obstruction. The examinations were preceded by abdominal ultrasound or intravenous urography (IVU). RESULTS - Out of the 60 sMRU examinations uretery dilatation were observed in 50 cases. In the background of obstruction, stone could be detected in 13 patients, dilatation was observed in 4 patients and MR did not indicate stone. In 7 cases with known neoplastic disease, associated urinary obstruction could be detected. In the background of obstruction primary neoplasm was found in 10 patients unknown prior the MR examination. Other benign obstruction occurred in 13 cases. Obstruction was not proved in 10 patients. In these cases the examination was justified by uncertain ultrasound findings together with abnormal renal function parameters. Follow up sMRU was performed in one patient. False diagnosis was established in two patients, the cause of dilatation was not found in one patient. CONCLUSIONS - The sMRU examination can provide more precise detection of the causes of severe urinary obstructions. It helps to define the level of obstruction in case of known malignant tumors. The grade of urinary dilatation could be also evaluated. The sMRU examination in conjunction with conventional sequences in multiple planes made possible to set up a correct therapy plan.]