Hungarian Radiology

[15th St. Agata Mammologist Day - Budapest, February 7, 2009]

PETRI Klára

JULY 15, 2009

Hungarian Radiology - 2009;83(02)

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Hungarian Radiology

[General Assembly of the Hungarian Society of Radiologists - Hévíz, 8 May, 2009]

MORVAY Zita

Hungarian Radiology

[The education, training and continuous professional development of the medical physicist within the European Qualifications Framework for lifelong learning]

STELIOS Christofides

Hungarian Radiology

[Can magnetic resonance imaging play a role in planning the method of delivery after Caesarean section?]

GERGELY István, CSÉCSEI Károly, DORFFNER Roland, BARANYAI Tibor

[INTRODUCTION - The number of Caesarean sections has been dramatically increasing worldwide, and also in Hungary in the last decade. In case of pregnancy following a preliminary Caesarean section it is always questioned if repeated Caesarean section or vaginal birth is required. The authors try to draw a conclusion from the thickness and the structure of the uterinal scar. The aim of the current study is to assess the additional role of uterinal MR examination undertaken between two births. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During our retrospective preliminary study T2 weighted sagittal images of uterinal MR examinations of 13 female patients were analysed. The presence of scar line was evaluated for thickness (millimetres, mm). This measurement was compared with the surgical report following consequent Caesarean section. Thus, a correlation was made between the surgical scar found at the repeated Caesarean section and the structure of the uterine scar seen by MR examination (between two births) which could play a role in the indication of the next birth. RESULTS - Three of our 13 patients gave birth via vagina (VBAC), and 10 via repeated Caesarean sections. According to the descriptions of the surgical scar the scars thinned out in six cases, whereas they made thickness in four. According to the appearance of the place of incision the scar was homogeneous and hypointens in nine cases, and inhomogeneous but basically hypointense in one case. According to the description of surgery in the MR examination the thinned out scar was thinner than 6 mm in 4 cases, and thicker than 6 mm in two cases. According to the description of surgery in the MR examination the nonthinned out scar was thinner than 6 mm in three cases, and thicker than 6 mm in one case. In two patients of three who gave birth via vagina the scar was thicker than 6 mm in the MR examination, and thinner than 6 mm in one case, the MR appearance of the scar was homogeneous and hypointens in two cases and complied with the original zonal anatomy in one case. CONCLUSION - In case repeated Caesarean section is not necessary from the aspect of the foetus or the mother, uterinal MR examination is of an additional significance in the complex indication of birth following a previous Caesarean section. The thickness, structure and signal intensity of the uterinal scar may provide a useful additional information.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Stories of Professor Zsebők Zoltán told by his pupil]

MÓZSA Szabolcs

Hungarian Radiology

[European Congress of Radiology - ECR 2009 - Vienna, 6-10 March, 2009]

WENINGER Csaba és munkatársai

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The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

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