Hungarian Immunology

[History of immunology in Hungary Part IV]

KARASSZON Dénes, CSABA Béla

FEBRUARY 15, 2004

Hungarian Immunology - 2004;3(02)

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Hungarian Immunology

[EULAR and ACR Conference, 02003.]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

Hungarian Immunology

[SS-A(Ro) and SS-B(La) autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus]

SALLAI Krisztina, NAGY Eszter, GERGELY Péter

[OBJECTIVE - To assess the relation between clinical features and the presence of SS-A(Ro) and SS-B(La) autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. PATIENTS - The data of 200 patients with definite systemic lupus erythematosus were analysed. SSA( Ro) and SS-B(La) antibodies were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS - 40.5% of systemic lupus erythematosus' patients were SS-A(Ro) and/or SS-B(La) antibody positive (’positive group’); the majority of such patients displayed both antibodies, 16.5% had SSA( Ro) antibodies alone, while only 2% has SS-B(La) antibodies alone. There were no differences in the occurrence of arthritis, secondary antiphospholipid syndrome and hematologic manifestations between the positive and negative groups; serositis was more common in the positive group. Skin manifestations, in particular subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and urticaria vasculitis were more frequent in the positive group, while kidney and central nervous system involvation, in particular severe forms were less frequent. Secondary Sjögren's syndrome occurred exclusively in antibody positive patients. Sm, RNP and Scl-70 antibodies were more frequently found in the positive group. CONCLUSIONS - The presence of SS-A(Ro) and/or SS-B(La) antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus has some prognostic significance; in antibody-positive patients there is an increased risk for skin lesions (in particular subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and urticaria vasculitis) and secondary Sjögren’s syndrome and a decreased risk for severe nephritis or central nervous system involvement.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Toll-like receptors and epithelial cells]

SZEGEDI Gyula

[Toll-like receptors have been extensively studied in the last few years. These receptors are involved in the mechanisms how microbes and infections are linked to natural immunity and some autoimmune-inflammatory processes. Here author reviews the latest news on Tolllike receptors with much emphasis on their role on epithelial cells. Therapeutic strategies targeting Toll-like receptors are also discussed.]

Hungarian Immunology

[β-endorphin concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum in systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis patients]

BARACZKA Krisztina, BENDER Tamás, BARNA István, GÉHER Pál

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of the present study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid and serum β- endorphin levels in several diseases characterized by central nervous system demyelinisation. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Ten patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with demyelinating syndrome and ten patients with chronic progressive form of multiple sclerosis were selected. Concentrations of β-endorphin were measured using a high sensitive, specific radioimmunoassay. Statistical significance (Wilcoxon test, two variable t test) and correlations (Spearman and Pearson correlations coefficients) were calculated. RESULTS - β-endorphin concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid did not differ in multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to the controls.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Diagnostic value of MRI in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis]

CONSTANTIN Tamás, PONYI Andrea, BALÁZS György, SALLAI Ágnes, DANKÓ Katalin, FEKETE György, KARÁDI Zoltán

[Diagnosis of juvenile dermatomyositis is based on the presence of proximal muscle weakness, characteristic skin lesions, muscle enzyme elevation in the serum, and may requires the performance of invasive procedures such as electromyography and/or muscle biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be an objective non-invasive tool to detect muscle involvement for diagnosis as well as for follow-up studies. We report a case of a 12 years old girl with definitive juvenile dermatomyositis. She received glucocorticoid therapy and achieved remission of the disease. After a long-term relapse free period, she was presented with severe proximal muscle weakness and normal creatinine kinase levels. The laboratory studies did not reveal acute inflammation or infection. In this case MRI was diagnostic to the relapse of juvenile dermatomyositis, with an increased STIR (short tau inversion recovery) signal of proximal muscles. The muscle involvement detected by MRI correlated with functional ability. After she achieved clinical remission, further follow-up MRI scans demonstrated that the affected muscles had returned to normal signal intensity. Findings of dermatomyositis on MRI scans include increased signal intensity in the affected muscles, perimuscular edema, chemical-shift artifact, and increased signal intensity in subcutaneous tissue. MRI is a sensitive technique and proposed to be a good indicator for an early diagnosis of the disease. MRI may also help to guide the muscle biopsy and may enhance the sensitivity of histological examination. After completion of therapy, MRI may be used for monitoring the progress of the disease as signal intensity of affected muscles returns to normal. MRI is also helpful, if the diagnosis is suspected but has not been formally evaluated.]

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[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]