Hungarian Immunology

[CONFERENCE CALENDAR]

MARCH 20, 2002

Hungarian Immunology - 2002;1(01)

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Hungarian Immunology

[In memoriam professor Gyula Petrányi]

SZEGEDI Gyula

Hungarian Immunology

[Neonatal activation of interferon-γ in macrophages]

ERDŐS Melinda, MARÓDI László

[Each individual passes through developmental or transient immunodeficiency due to the immaturity of the immune system in early childhood, expecially in the neonatal period. Therefore, neonates contract infections by intracellular and extracellular microorganisms more easily than older children and adults, and develop more severe disease with a high mortality rate. A number of abnormalities in the neonate’s host defense systems have been described suggesting that the immune system at birth functionally differs from that in adults. Neonatal T and B cells show decreased reactivity to antigens and mitogens and have deficienct IgM-IgG isotype switching. Newborns have decreased functional capacities of the hemolytic complement system. Under the same in vitro and in vivo conditions neonatal granulocytes show functional deficiency earlier than adult cells. Effector mechanisms of the cell-mediated immunity involve activation of macrophages by T helper1 cytokines, particularly interferon- γ (IFN-γ). IFN-γ is the most important macrophage-activating cytokine in vivo. Neonatal T cells express lower levels of IFN-γ and macrophages are hyporesponsive to activation by this cytokine. This deficiency may be explained by decreased phosphorilation of STAT1 despite comparable expression of STAT1 protein in neonatal and adult macrophages.]

Hungarian Immunology

[Anti-inflammatory effects of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in immunothrombocytopenic purpura]

ERDŐS Melinda, MARÓDI László

Hungarian Immunology

[2nd C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency workshop, April 2001, Budapest]

FARKAS Henriette, VARGA Lilian, HARMAT György, FÜST György

Hungarian Immunology

[Patomechanism of hereditary angioneurotic oedema and provoking factors of oedematous attacks]

FARKAS Henriette

[The author describes the genetic background of hereditary angioneurotic edema, an autosomal dominant disorder. The pathomechanism of edemaformation and the significance of major mediator substances are explained along with clinical manifestations and their management. A special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis, the mainstay of which is the elimination of precipitating factors. The latter include mechanical trauma, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions performed in the cephalic-cervical region, mental stress, and sex hormones. The effect of endocrine therapies, ACE inhibitors, and infections - Helicobacter pylori in particular - on the natural course of the disease is also discussed.]

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[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]