Clinical Oncology

[Non surgical treatment of urinary bladder cancer]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

DECEMBER 10, 2015

Clinical Oncology - 2015;2(04)

[According to our present knowledge the surgical intervention in the treatment of bladder cancer is essential, but some non-surgical treatment methods play an indispensable role as well. Super- fi cial (non-muscle-invasive) form of bladder cancer can be treated by intravesical chemotherapy or BCG instillation, radiotherapy; the muscle-invasive forms of this tumour (≥pT2a) need neoadjuvant, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy. In case of metastatic disease (or locally advanced, recurrent disease) the treatment regimen consist of chemotherapy (given as fi rst line or second line), palliative radiotherapy, interventional methods, radio-isotope therapy and symptoms relief drugs. We present each of the therapeutic modalities and their indications category based on the ESMO and NCCN guidelines.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Oncology

[Should docetaxel be standard of care for patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer? Pro and contra]

FIZAZI K, JENKINS C, TANNOCK IF

[Following the results of the TAX-327 study, questions have been raised as to whether administering chemotherapy to patient with prostate cancer before symptomatic disease progression when receiving standard hormonal treatment can improve the duration and quality of survival. The GETUG-AFU-15 and CHAARTED studies assessed the effi cacy and tolerability of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with or without docetaxel in patients with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer. Both studies included a mix of patients with de novo metastatic disease (~75%) and patients with metastases following treatment of localized disease. A short course of ADT was allowed in both trials prior to accrual. Key differences between the two studies include the number of patients with high-volume metastases (GETUGAFU- 15: 52%; CHAARTED: 65%) and number of docetaxel cycles (GETUG-AFU-15: up to nine cycles; CHAARTED six cycles). Both studies reported an improvement in progression-free survival with docetaxel plus ADT versus ADT alone. The GETUG-AFU-15 did not fi nd a signifi cant difference in the primary end point of overall survival (OS) [hazard ratio (HR) 0.9 (95% confi dence interval (CI) 0.7-1.2); P = 0.44] for ADT plus docetaxel versus ADT alone. The CHAARTED study met the primary end point of OS [HR 0.61 (95% CI 0.47-0.80); P = 0.0003], and in a subset analysis reported the greatest improvement in OS for patients with high-volume disease [HR 0.60 (95% CI 0.45-0.81); P = 0.0006]. The following review debates the results from the GETUG-AFU-15 and CHAARTED studies and asks whether medical practice should be changed for patients with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer based on the results of one positive study.]

Clinical Oncology

[The role of physical activity in oncology]

PETRÁNYI Ágota, GYIMESI Zsófia

[Although nowadays there are a lot spoken about the role of physical activity in illness prevention, however it is barely connected to the treatment of malignant diseases. The regular exercises can improve physical performance and fi tness; increase muscle mass; change the body composition and proportion favorably. The positive psychological effects can decrease distress and depression; improve mood of patient; increase self-confi dence and self-respect. Finally, all of these will result in an improved quality of life. The malignant disease and the treatments can draw down either short-term or long-term consequences and side-effects that can largely infl uence or restrict everyday life. Most of them could be essentially reduced by the help of a physiotherapist experienced in oncology adopting a well-defi ned and customized workout.]

Clinical Oncology

[Current treatment of gastrointestinal lymphomas]

PAKSI Melinda, ISTENES Ildikó, KÖRÖSMEZEY Gábor, DEMETER Judit

[The most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma is the gastrointestinal tract. The majority of extranodal lymphoma cases are of the non-Hodgkin subtype. Usually, the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract by nodal lymphomas is secondary, the primary gastrointestinal localisation is rather rare. The most common pathological types are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of the mucosa-associated tissue (MALT) subtype. Although the primary gastrointestinal lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the stomach is the most frequently involved site. The treatment and prognosis are determinated primarily by the histologic type of lymphoma, the stage of disease and the patient’s age and general condition. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is one of the major risk factors for gastric lymphomas, the presence or abscence of which radically infl uences the effectivity of treatment. In case of HP positivity, HP eradication itself can result in complete remission. In most cases the treatment is immuno- and/or combination chemotherapy, which is performed according to the internationally accepted protocols, specifi c to the type of lymphoma. Radiotherapy plays a lesser role in the treatment of GI lymphomas, while surgery is performed almost only in complicated cases, such as haemorrhage, occlusion or perforation.]

Clinical Oncology

[The role of EGFR receptor family in the oncological practice]

MÉHES Gábor

[The EGFR receptor family is a set of membrane tirosine kinase receptors with signifi cant homology which are responsible for cellular activation through intracellular signaling due to ligand binding. The four members of the family (EGFR1, EGFR2/HER2/neu, EGFR3/HER3, EGFR4/HER4) earned special interest in tumor biology while becoming one of the most potent targets of anti-cancer therapies. Changes in the receptor expression or in the kinase activity fundamentally modify cellular functions, survival and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, mutations are associated with reduced or altered treatment effi cacy. The basic function and major genetic and biological mechanisms affecting the function of EGFR receptors and related therapies are subjects of this overview.]

Clinical Oncology

[Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for solid tumors in adults]

GOPCSA László Zsolt, MASSZI Tamás

[We revised the medical literature regarding autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the setting of solid tumors. Autologous-HSCT for solid tumors in adult patients show changing patterns in past decades with decreases numbers for many types of solid tumors. Most marked is the previously well-described increase and decrease in autologous HSCT for breast cancer (BC). Autologous-HSCT for BC has been an area of intense controversy. The role of autologous-HSCT for BC at high risk of recurrence (at least four involved axillary lymph nodes) has been assessed by several randomized trials. Overall, it was shown that high-dose therapy prolonged disease-free survival when used as adjuvant therapy, and showed a benefi t on overall survival in only selected cohorts of patients. In second or further relapsed or primary refractory germ cell tumor, highdose therapy is considered to be a standard therapeutic option, especially when poor prognostic factors are present. In addition, sequential therapy with two to three cycles is felt to be superior to single cycle of HSCT. High-dose therapy can be regarded as a potential clinical option in selected adult patients with Ewing’s sarcoma and medulloblastoma. Currently, in other types of solid tumors the autologous- HSCT is generally not recommended or developmental and only used in the context of prospective studies. Numbers of allogeneic HSCT for solid tumors remained stable low number throughout the recent years. Transient increase is observed over the last decade and is primarily due to renal cell carcinoma, BC and colon cancer. Concepts of allogeneic HSCT for solid tumors do not rely on highdose chemotherapy and tumor load reduction but rather on a graft-versus-tumor effect. Attempts to improve the therapeutic effect of allo-HSCT or other cellular therapies in solid tumors by innovative clinical strategies are underway.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of childhood tumors of mesenchymal origin]

CSÓKA Monika

[Mesenchymal cells can be differentiated into skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, adipose tissue, fi brous tissue, bone and cartilage. Tumors can be originated from these tissues as benign tumors - fibroma, lipoma, osteoma, chondroma, haemangioma, myoma, etc. or as malignant tumors - in childhood, most commonly rhabdomyosarcomas, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, less often fi brosarcoma, liposarcoma or other rare types. Clinically, the outcome of these tumors have improved signifi cantly in the last decade due to the use of multi-modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, irradiation, in some cases targeted therapy). The better treatment results are based on early diagnosis and adequate management according to international treatment protocols in pediatric oncology centers.]

Clinical Oncology

[Oncological management of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasias]

PETRÁNYI Ágota, UHLYARIK Andrea, RÁCZ Károly, BODOKY György

[Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are unusual and relatively rare neoplasms. They characteristically synthetize, store and secrete a variety of peptides and neuroamines, which can lead to development of disctinct clinical syndromes. Clinical symptoms and presentations vary depending on the location and hormones produced by the tumor. The diagnosis of NETs is established by histological examination and the immunohistochemical detection of general neuroendocrine markers, such as chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin. An update of the WHO classifi cation has resulted in a new classifi cation dividing neuroendocrine neoplasms into neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumors and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index >20%, G3. The different available therapeutic approaches, including surgery, liver-directed ablative therapies, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and systemic hormonal, cytotoxic or targeted therapy, are discussed in this overview.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The clinical importance of HER2 expression in breast cancer]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna

[HER2 (neu/c-erbB-2) is a member of the EGF receptor family. It is activated without binding a specific ligand that leads to malignant transformation and tumor progression. Overexpression of HER2 is detected in approximately one quarter of human breast cancers. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (FISH) are the most widely used techniques in studying HER2 expression. HER2 positivity indicates worse outcome in node positive breast cancer and increasing number of studies show unfavourable prognosis in node negative cases as well. Recent data indicate that the knowledge of HER2 status may promote therapeutic decision. The generally applied cyclophosphamide- methotrexate-5-fluorouracil (CMF) polychemotherapy seems to provide no benefit in HER2 positive cases in contrast with HER2 negative breast cancer patients. Interestingly, doseintensive doxorubicin based chemotherapy gives better results in HER2 positive than in HER2 negative tumors. Determination of HER2 expression has great importance before therapeutic application of the humanized antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). HER2 overexpression usually correlates well with estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity and hormone-resistance, therefore hormonal therapy is not justified for these patients. Some experimental and clinical data indicate that in case of simultaneous HER2 and ER positivity tamoxifen worsens treatment results which may be prevented by the coadministration of tamoxifen and trastuzumab. Emerging experimental and clinical data about HER2 has led to a new stage of individual treatment of breast cancer patients. The knowledge of HER2 status promotes antitumor intervention based on molecular characteristics of breast cancers. Therefore, reliable HER2 tests are needed in the everyday practice.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of locally advanced rectum cancer]

FRÖBE Ana, JURETIC Antonio, BROZIC Marić Jasmina, SOLDIC Zeljko, ZOVAK Mario

[Over the last several decades, local control (LC) for rectal cancer has markedly improved because of advances in surgical technique and the adoption of adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Total mesorectal excision (TME) during surgical resection of localized rectal cancer, which involves removal of the entire circumferential perirectal tissue envelope, decreases rates of both involved surgical margins and local recurrences. Similarly, for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), including T3 and T4 tumors and lymph node-positive disease, adjuvant and more preferably neoadjuvant CRT has exhibited the ability to both improve disease-free survival (DFS) and LC. Some patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT achieve a complete pathologic response (pCR) to CRT and the oncologic outcomes are particularly favourable in this group. In contrast to improved local control, patients’ overall survival rates are in need of improvement, and the major factor limiting the outcome is the appearance of metachronous distant metastases. The main approach to overcome this issue is the escalation of systemic therapy in the neoadjuvant setting, e.g. by addition of induction or consolidation chemotherapy before or after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (the so-called total neoadjuvant treatment, TNT, approach). The aim was to present a short overview of the role of radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy in the management of rectal cancer with a focus on current treatment stand wasards for locally advanced rectal cancer.]

Clinical Oncology

[Cancer-treatment induced peripheral neuropathy]

DEMETER Gyula

[Peripheral neuropathy is caused by structural or functional damage of nervous system. The pathophysiology is not well known. Its clinical features are established but there is a need to standardize CIPN assessment, also considering that health care providers and patients frequently have a different perception of CIPN severity. Neurotoxicity caused by traditional chemotherapy is widely recognized in patients with cancer. The adverse effects of newer therapeutics, such as targeting and immunotherapeutic agents, need more information for the proper management. This review addresses the main neurotoxicities of cancer treatments with a focus on the newer therapeutics. Recognition of these patterns of toxicity is important because drug discontinuation or dose adjustment might prevent further neurological injury. Treatment is symptomatic. For prevention or treatment there is need for further basic research outcomes.]