Clinical Oncology

[Neoadjuvant treatment of rectal cancer]

PINTÉR Tamás

FEBRUARY 10, 2015

Clinical Oncology - 2015;2(01)

[Rectal cancer due to its frequent local invasion, high recurrence rate and metastatic potential is a serious health problem, leading to decreased life quality, severe complaints and death. Treatment for locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer improved over the years. Various chemotherapy protocols and combinations with radiation therapy and radical surgery - total mesorectal excision (TMA) - are the main elements of current therapy. Preoperative combined chemoradiation followed by surgery is the preferred treatment sequence. Radiation treatment in combination with fl uoropyrimidines (infusional 5-fl uorouracil [5-FU] or oral capecitabine) is recommended. Clinical trials with oxaliplatin-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation did not improve the pathologic complete response rate (pCR). Oxaliplatin-based treatment was more toxic as compared with 5-FU. The data concerning local recurrence rate and survival are controversial. Adjuvant chemotherapy in some studies improved survival, so - based on positive results in colon cancer - adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy may be recommended.]

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Clinical Oncology

[Treatments of brain tumors in adults – an up-date]

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[Maximal safe resection is the fi rst step in the complex neurooncological therapy of adult brain tumors. Surgical management of brain tumors, including the surgical innovations (neuronavigation, intraoperative imaging, awake craniotomy, intraoperative electrophysiology) providing more radical resection with the safe preservation of neurological functions will be presented. In case of malignancy the surgery is followed by radiation and chemotherapy. In this review we describe the postoperative adjuvant therapeutical modatilites available for primary and metastatic tumors, emphasizing the modern chemotherapy of high grade gliomas and stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases. As a conclusion we summerize the guidelines and modalities for the most common adult brain tumors, according to histological type and grade.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatments of brain tumors in adults – an up-date]

BAGÓ Attila György

[The prognosis of brain metastases is very poor. Surgery and radiotherapy provides the fi rst line treatment, while systemic therapy has limited value. Nevertheless, our knowledge is increasing: normal cells contribute signifi cantly to the homing and growth of tumor cells; the molecular profi le of the primary tumor and its metastases could be different, which infl uences the therapeutic strategies; the type of blood supply can change during the tumor growth. It would be very important to optimize the cooperation of the different therapeutic modalities, and to fi nd markers which could predict the risk of metastatization.]

Clinical Oncology

[Oncological management of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasias]

PETRÁNYI Ágota, UHLYARIK Andrea, RÁCZ Károly, BODOKY György

[Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are unusual and relatively rare neoplasms. They characteristically synthetize, store and secrete a variety of peptides and neuroamines, which can lead to development of disctinct clinical syndromes. Clinical symptoms and presentations vary depending on the location and hormones produced by the tumor. The diagnosis of NETs is established by histological examination and the immunohistochemical detection of general neuroendocrine markers, such as chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin. An update of the WHO classifi cation has resulted in a new classifi cation dividing neuroendocrine neoplasms into neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumors and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index >20%, G3. The different available therapeutic approaches, including surgery, liver-directed ablative therapies, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and systemic hormonal, cytotoxic or targeted therapy, are discussed in this overview.]

Clinical Oncology

[Development in the treatment of non-operable, metastatic colorectal cancer]

GRAMONT de Aimery

[Today, due to the steady improvement, the survival of patients with non-operable, metastasic colorectal cancer is about 30 months. This review discusses the results of recent clinical trials, the new drugs, the treatment protocols as well as the tumor response after surgery. A suggestion will be made not only on an optimal treament strategy, but also how to increase the survival, and the feasibility of a secunder resection.]

Clinical Oncology

[Molecular diagnostics of brain tumors - an up-date]

REINIGER Lilla, HANZÉLY Zoltán, BÁLINT Katalin, TURÁNYI Eszter

[In recent years there have been major advancements in the understanding of molecular events driving brain tumor genesis and progression. Although state-of-the-art techniques are not widely available, many of the molecular discoveries lead to novel antibodies that can assist in identifying the major molecular subgroups by immunohistochemistry. Molecular informations will likely be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classifi cation of central nervous system tumors, but clinical practice in many centres have already taken on the available informations and therapeutic decisions are made based on genetic/epigenetic information. In the adult population IDH, ATRX and 1p/19q codeletion studies help to defi ne molecular subgroups that correlate better with prognosis and therapeutic response than traditional histology based diagnosis. The KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene is a hallmark for pilocytic astrocytomas, while diffuse pediatric gliomas lack the IDH mutations and 1p/19q codeletions that are common in adult astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. Uncommon in adults, Histone H3.3 mutations are pathognomic in pediatric brainstem malignant gliomas. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastomas have also been identifi ed, and a corresponding set of antibodies are ready to guide treatment decisions in those centres where molecular techniques are not available. These genetic and epigenetic events determine a tumor’s behaviour, and integrating this level of informations into neuropathology practice is essential to provide the best possible care to both pediatric and adult patients.]

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[Cancer-treatment induced peripheral neuropathy]

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[Peripheral neuropathy is caused by structural or functional damage of nervous system. The pathophysiology is not well known. Its clinical features are established but there is a need to standardize CIPN assessment, also considering that health care providers and patients frequently have a different perception of CIPN severity. Neurotoxicity caused by traditional chemotherapy is widely recognized in patients with cancer. The adverse effects of newer therapeutics, such as targeting and immunotherapeutic agents, need more information for the proper management. This review addresses the main neurotoxicities of cancer treatments with a focus on the newer therapeutics. Recognition of these patterns of toxicity is important because drug discontinuation or dose adjustment might prevent further neurological injury. Treatment is symptomatic. For prevention or treatment there is need for further basic research outcomes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Temozolomide chemotherapy of patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas]

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[Introduction - Anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas are the most frequent and most malignant hemispherial tumours. Unfortunately, astrocytic tumours are of infiltrative character and radical removal is not possible. Recurrent malignant gliomas are rarely suitable for reoperation. In most of the cases of recurrent gliomas chemotherapy is the last choice. Patients and method - Seventy-five consecutive patients with recurrent malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas had been treated at our institute with per os temozolomide for five days every month. The patients received two to 16 courses of chemotherapy. The toxicity, quality of life, response to chemotherapy and survival data were analysed. Results - Out of 75 patients four were excluded following the first treatment due to myelotoxicity, and allergic reactions. Among the patients treated with temozolomide in seven cases complete response, 17 partial response, 14 progressive disease were observed. In 33 cases the disease stabilized and out of them in 27% a significant neurological improvement was detected. The time to progression was 6.8 months and the median survival time 8.75 months for patients with glioblastoma and with malignant astrocytoma or malignant mixed oligoastrocytoma 9.45 and 11.15 months, respectively. The overall survival for patients with originally lower grade glioma was 70.32 and for patients with glioblastoma multiforme 17.43 months. Conclusions - Temozolomide chemotherapy in patients with recurrent malignant astrocytoma and glioblastoma proved to be efficacious and similar good results were achieved as with a nitrosourea based combined chemotherapy. Even in those patients who received previous chemotherapy temozolomide is well tolerated and a relatively long time to progression was achieved in cases of recurrent malignant gliomas. In a few number of patients where BCNU had been previously failed with temozolomide stable disease was achieved. Temozolomide seems to be a promising drug in the chemotherapy of malignant gliomas and can be applied as a second line chemotherapy, as well.]

Clinical Oncology

[Oncological management of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasias]

PETRÁNYI Ágota, UHLYARIK Andrea, RÁCZ Károly, BODOKY György

[Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are unusual and relatively rare neoplasms. They characteristically synthetize, store and secrete a variety of peptides and neuroamines, which can lead to development of disctinct clinical syndromes. Clinical symptoms and presentations vary depending on the location and hormones produced by the tumor. The diagnosis of NETs is established by histological examination and the immunohistochemical detection of general neuroendocrine markers, such as chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin. An update of the WHO classifi cation has resulted in a new classifi cation dividing neuroendocrine neoplasms into neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumors and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index >20%, G3. The different available therapeutic approaches, including surgery, liver-directed ablative therapies, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and systemic hormonal, cytotoxic or targeted therapy, are discussed in this overview.]

Clinical Oncology

[Recent strategies in the chemoterapy of soft tissue tumors]

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[Conventional adjuvant therapy is, in most cases, either the well-known standard doxorubicin monotherapy or the combination of doxorubicin + ifosfamide. No clear guideline has been developed yet - adjuvant therapy is recommended in cases with high grade, larger than 10 cm, sarcoma, where surgery hasn’t been suffi ciently radical, and adjuvant radiotherapy may not be advisable. In locally advanced tumors, due to the requirements of limb salvage, isolated limb perfusion is recommended. As a new compound, hafnium-oxide nanoparticles (NBTXR3) can be useful in local therapy: combining intratumoral injection and radiotherapy may be a fl agship initiative, however further investigations are necessary. In the treatment of metastatic tumors, beside the standard methods, new, targeted treatments are becoming more and more prevalent: in leiomyosarcomas trabectedine, pazopanib and olaratumab; in liposarcomas trabectedine and eribulin; in synovial sarcomas pazopanib; and in imatinib-resistant GIST, sunitinib and regorafenib. Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors categorized as heterogeneous histological subtypes. In their treatment, it is key to customize the treatment based on these subtypes and interdisciplinary collaboration with the orthopedic surgeon, the pathologist and the radiotherapist to determine the suitable therapy for each individual.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[BREAST CANCER CARE: FROM PREVENTION TO SURVEILLANCE]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna

[Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in developed countries. The development of most breast cancers is related to various hormonal effects, while 10% is associated with inherited gene mutations. Most of the primary prevention methods aim at decreasing the effects of hormones, but education on proper lifestyle is also an important risk-lowering method. The primary treatment of early breast cancer is usually breast-conserving surgery, either with the targeted removal of regional lymph nodes (by sentinel lymph node labelling) or with axillary block-dissection. The aim of postoperative radiotherapy is the eradication of the tumour cells left behind. Beside the locoregional tumour control this also plays a role in the prevention of recurrence or a secondary systemic dissemination. Adjuvant systemic treatments are used for the eradication of disseminated microscopic tumour foci. The use of modern adjuvant treatments may reduce death from the disease by up to 50%. The risks of relapse or death may be estimated based on established prognostic factors. While in low-risk patients it is not worth starting medical treatment, especially in view of the side effects, while in other cases chemo- or hormonal therapy may save the patient's life. The choice of the medical treatment should also depend on the patient's general health, the concomittant diseases and her preferences. The collaboration of the various specialists involved in the care of breast cancer patients can best take place at specialised breast centres that are equipped with the necessary technical basis, knowledge and professional experience.]