Clinical Oncology

[Medical use of marihuana especially in oncology]

VÉGH Éva

DECEMBER 10, 2018

Clinical Oncology - 2018;5(04)

[The medical use of marijuana has gained a considerable attention among wide range of cancer patients lately in Hungary. Consequently, oncologist sare facing questions related to cannabinoids more and more in their clinical practice. This article aims to clarify some basic concepts and to give a brief introduction on the current international and national legislation on their accessibility. Numerous publications have dealt with the application of marijuana in various indications. Among the tumour related indications, the concerned studies mainly refer to chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, chronic pain, sleep disorders, anorexia and cachexia. The article also to uches upon on knowledge connected to the causal treatment of malignant tumours, which are currently limited to glioblastoma. Information on the carcinogenic potential of cannabis and information on the popularity and attitudes of American oncologists can be found in this article. This paper gives a literature review in the above mentioned themes.]

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