Clinical Oncology

[Foreword]

A szerkesztők

FEBRUARY 10, 2018

Clinical Oncology - 2018;5(01)

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Further articles in this publication

Clinical Oncology

[News from the World]

KLINIKAI Onkológia

Clinical Oncology

[New results from San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, 2017]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna

[SABCS 2017 has been a 40-year jubilee conference with festive appearance and content. The anniversary provides possibility to look back: today we fi nd the knowledge and practice as of twenty years ago schematic and rough while the changes are overwhelming. Therapy became colorful and personally. There is need for precisious care which means consideration all patient and tumor features when surgical or medical therapy, radiotherapy or even diagnostic issues are decided - this has been the most important message of the conference this year. The Symposium always provides the most modern and breakthrough approaches and attitude that support advancement in patient care.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma - an update]

DEMETER Gyula, VÉGH Éva

[Last time we have described about the modern treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in „Klinikai Onkológia” in 2014 (1) and a detailed guideline regarding epidemiology, treatment according to BCLC staging system has been published as well in a special edition in this year (2). Here, we discuss mainly the fi rst- and second line systemic treatment of HCC according to our experience and the new results of clinical trials. 203 patients were treated in our Department between 2010 and 2016. These results have been presented already on the MKOT conference in 2016. In this year we have started second line systemic therapy with regorafenib in 9 cases.]

Clinical Oncology

[Solid organ transplantation and malignancies]

VÉGSŐ Gyula, MÁTHÉ Zoltán

[Recent breakthroughs in the fi eld of organ transplantation and oncology have challenged existing views, and necessitate the revision of several tumor-related issues in transplantation. The need for expanding the donor pool raises the question of how and when it is plausible to transplant the organs of a donor with a history of cancer, such that the risk of tumor inoculation and manifestation due to the graft would be minimal for the recipient. Another point to consider is whether it is acceptable to transplant a recipient with a history of a malignant tumor, and if yes, how much tumor-free survival time is required as a minimum before the transplant. Transplanted patients live longer as a result of modern immunosuppressive therapy. However, the risk of malignant tumors increases proportionally to the length of the immunosuppressed state: their incidence may be as much as 20-30% in the long term. The signifi cance of „de novo” posttransplant tumors is highlighted by the fact that they are among the leading causes of death in transplant patients. Taken together, malignant diseases pose a serious problem from several aspects, the solution for which requires close teamwork of experts in oncology and transplantation, and the integration of up-to-date knowledge in the process of making a therapeutic decision, tailored individually for the patient.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of locally advanced rectum cancer]

FRÖBE Ana, JURETIC Antonio, BROZIC Marić Jasmina, SOLDIC Zeljko, ZOVAK Mario

[Over the last several decades, local control (LC) for rectal cancer has markedly improved because of advances in surgical technique and the adoption of adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Total mesorectal excision (TME) during surgical resection of localized rectal cancer, which involves removal of the entire circumferential perirectal tissue envelope, decreases rates of both involved surgical margins and local recurrences. Similarly, for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), including T3 and T4 tumors and lymph node-positive disease, adjuvant and more preferably neoadjuvant CRT has exhibited the ability to both improve disease-free survival (DFS) and LC. Some patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT achieve a complete pathologic response (pCR) to CRT and the oncologic outcomes are particularly favourable in this group. In contrast to improved local control, patients’ overall survival rates are in need of improvement, and the major factor limiting the outcome is the appearance of metachronous distant metastases. The main approach to overcome this issue is the escalation of systemic therapy in the neoadjuvant setting, e.g. by addition of induction or consolidation chemotherapy before or after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (the so-called total neoadjuvant treatment, TNT, approach). The aim was to present a short overview of the role of radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy in the management of rectal cancer with a focus on current treatment stand wasards for locally advanced rectal cancer.]

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