Clinical Neuroscience

[Vertigo - comorbidity with psychiatric disorders]

FAZEKAS András

MARCH 24, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(03-04)

[Vertigo is one of the most common symptom and complaint in the clinical practice. The differential diagnosis can only be attained by a careful interdisciplinary way of thinking and activity, given the fact that the vestibular, neurological and psychiatric disorders - considered as pathogenic factors - are being present simultaneously in triggering the symptoms, and there can be overlaps between the certain pathological processes. The author deals with the co-morbidity of the vertigo and the psychiatric symptoms - anxiety, panic-disorder -, pointing out the common neurobiological and neurophysiological factors in the background of the symptoms, emphasizing the importance of the SSRI-s in the restoration of the serotonerg dysfunction.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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