Clinical Neuroscience

[Validation of the Hungarian Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale]

HORVÁTH Krisztina, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, ÁCS Péter, BOSNYÁK Edit, DELI Gabriella, PÁL Endre, KÉSMÁRKI Ildikó, HORVÁTH Réka, TAKÁCS Katalin, BALÁZS Éva, KOMOLY Sámuel, BOKOR Magdolna, RIGÓ Eszter, LAJTOS Júl

MAY 30, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(05-06)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.68.0183

[Background - The Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS) was published in 2008. It was designed to be simultaneous valid, reliable and sensitive to therapeutic changes. The Movement Disorder Society organizing team developed guidelines for the development of official non- English translations consisting of four steps: translation/back-translation, cognitive pretesting, large field testing, and clinimetric analysis. The aim of this paper was to introduce the new UDysRS and its validation process into Hungarian. Methods - After the translation of UDysRS into Hungarian and back-translated into English, it was reviewed by the UDysRS translation administration team. Subsequent cognitive pretesting was conducted with ten patients. For the large field testing phase, the Hungarian official working draft version of UDysRS was tested with 256 patients with Parkinson’s disease having dyskinesia. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) determined whether the factor structure for the valid Spanish UDysRS could be confirmed in data collected using the Hungarian Official Draft Version. To become an official translation, the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) had to be ≥0.90 compared to the Spanish-language version. Results - For the Hungarian UDysRS the CFI was 0.98. Conclusion - The overall factor structure of the Hungarian version was consistent with that of the Spanish version based on the high CFIs for the UDysRS in the CFA; therefore, this version was designated as the Official Hungarian Version Of The UDysRS.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Watershed infarction in hypereosinophilic syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma in FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-associated myeloid neoplasm

IMELDA Marton, PÓSFAI Éva, ANNUS János Kristóf, BORBÉNYI Zita, NEMES Attila, VÉCSEI László, VÖRÖS Erika

Introduction - The FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-positive, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a new category of hematological entities. Various clinical symptoms may occur, with no specific characteristics in either the clinical picture or the neuroimaging findings, and this may give rise to a diagnostic dilemma. A report on a long follow-up period (10 years) in a case of HES that presented with neuropsychiatric symptoms appears to be unique. Besides the complexity of the diagnostic process, the successful treatment is discussed. Case report - The HES was diagnosed in a male patient at the age of 33 years, with involvement of the central nervous system and the myocardium. After the onset of the clinical signs, the MRI indicated bilateral cerebral and cerebellar cortico-subcortical lesions involving the watershed areas, mainly in the parieto-occipital regions. High-dose intravenous steroid (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day) alleviated the neurological symptoms within a few weeks, and the administration of imatinib (200 mg/day) resulted in an impressive regression of the hypereosinophilia and splenomegaly within 6 weeks. During the follow-up, the patient has continued to receive imatinib. The molecular remission has persisted, no new complaints have developed and the condition of the patient has remained stable. Conclusion - The timely recognition of the HES and identification of the disease subtype which led to the administration of imatinib may be the key to successful treatment. The long stable follow-up period gives rise to a new dilemma in the treatment of the HES in these special cases: for how long should a patient receive a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and may the treatment be suspended?

Clinical Neuroscience

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency - disease or misdiagnosis?

PÁNCZÉL Gyula, SZIKORA István, BERENTEI Zsolt, GUBUCZ István, MAROSFŐI Miklós, KOVÁCS Krisztina, RÓZSA Anikó, RÓZSA Csilla

Background and purpose - Former studies reported internal jugular vein stenosis in patients with multiple sclerosis. We aimed to evaluate if these venous stenoses were real and cerebral venous outflow of patients with multiple sclerosis differed from that of normal controls. Methods - 20 controls were prospectively investigated by angiography and duplex ultrasound. Seven patients with multiple sclerosis underwent angiography in other centers; we reviewed these registrations and performed venous ultrasound examinations. Results - Angiography displayed >50% stenosis of internal jugular vein in 19 controls (69±17% on the right and 73±13% on the left side) and <50% stenosis in 1 control (43.5% and 44.6%). All 7 patients had at least one-sided stenosis. The mean degree of stenosis was 63±16% on the right and 67±13% on the left side. There was no significant difference in the degree of stenosis between patients and controls. However, these “stenoses” disappeared if the contrast agent was injected at a catheter position below the orifice of the subclavian vein during venography. The venous flow volume was also similar between groups: 479.7±214.1 and 509.8±212.0 ml/min (right and left side) in the patients and 461.3±224.3 and 513.6±352.2 ml/min in the control group; p=0.85 and 0.98 (right and left). Color and power duplex imaging also revealed normal blood flow of the internal jugular vein in all patients and controls. Conclusion - The cerebral venous status of patients with multiple sclerosis and controls were similar. The angiographic “stenoses” were virtual, caused by the contrast dilution effect of the non-contrast blood stream of the subclavian vein.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation - first experiencies in Hungary with novel patented method in therapy of chronic subjectiv tinnitus]

BENCSIK Beáta, GÁBORJÁN Anita, HARNOS Andrea, LÁSZLÓ Klára, VÉGSŐ Péter, TAMÁS László

[Objective - Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation is a novel patented method for the therapy of chronic subjective tinnitus and has been tested in Hungary, as one of the first European countries introducing this procedure. It can be used for the treatment of monaural or binaural tonal tinnitus. Suitability of patients for this therapy was assessed by the help of an appropriate set of criteria. Aim of our study was to analyze 6-month therapy and related measurement data of patients first treated with this method in Hungary and evaluate the results. Method - 27 outpatients (20 males, seven females) with a minimum of 6-month long history of subjective tinnitus were assessed (four detected on the right side, six on the left side, 17 on both sides) who were treated for six months by Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation. On 44 treated ears (21 right, 23 left), changes of tinnitus frequency and loudness were measured and analysed, using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) loudness/annoyance/pitch scores and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory tests, which were performed at defined intervals during the treatment period. Results - During this 6-month treatment period, significant decrease was detected in tinnitus frequency and loudness by tinnitometry (irrespective of the affected side), and an improvement in VAS annoyance/pitch scores and THI test results. VAS loudness did not show any significant changes. Conclusion - Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation therapy may be a useful treatment of subjective chronic tinnitus, but its efficacy should be proved in controlled clinical trials.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Alemtuzumab: benefits and challenges of new therapy in multiple sclerosis]

ILLÉS Zsolt, TOBIAS Sejbaek, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[The widening spectrum of MS treatment is partially due to increasing knowledge about the pathogenesis of MS. The humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, alemtuzumab has been approved in Europe for the treatment of MS, which results in long-term depletion of B and T cells due to complement- and antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. Based on phase 2 and 3 clinical trials, alemtuzumab decreases the risk of sustained neurological deficit and progression compared to high-dose subcutaneous interferon- β1a in patients with active relapsing-remitting MS, either treatment-naïve or with breakthrough disease. We review advantages and benefits of the treatment, discuss safety concerns, and present a case to describe practical issues.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[The questions of the treatment of Parkinson’s disease]

NAGY Ferenc

[Despite the continuous development of diagnosis and treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease and the arrival of new therapeutic options in recent years the treatment and care of people with Parkinson’s disease especially in the advanced stage remains a major challenge for neurologists specialized in movement disorders. The treatment of Parkinson’s disease is adversely affected by several factors: the disease progresses relentlessly, the symptoms and rate of progression, other concomitant non-motor symptoms, and the appearance of complications caused by treatment show great heterogeneity. Based on all these factors it is difficult to develop and apply a uniform routine therapeutic guideline. This summary seeks to shed light on aspects of the treatment of Parkinson’s disease particularly in advanced-stage cases drawing on data from a professional college recommendation and the literature.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Objective measurement of manual dexterity of Parkinson patients operated with DBS]

SZÁNTÓ Ildikó, SÁNDOR Balázs, KATONA Krisztián, NAGY Máté, JUHÁSZ Annamária, BALÁS István

[The evaluation of hand dexterity is an important marker for the success of DBS (deep brain stimulation) operation in patients with Parkinson’s disease. In this study we applied a simple, semiquantitative optical dental plaque staining technique for the evaluation of the hand dexterity. Ten patient with Parkinson’s disease were involved in the study. After dental students aided tooth brushing, bacterial dental deposits (plaque) were stained then photographed, and quantified under standard conditions before and after DBS surgery. Our results showed a significant decrease in dental plaque deposits after DBS operation. This simple technique seems to be a routinely applicable marker for the evaluation of the hand dexterity. Our future plans is repeating the previous experiement on a higher number of cases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The absence of the common LRRK2 G2019S mutation in 120 young onset Hungarian Parkinon’s disease patients]

BALICZA Péter, BEREZNAI Benjámin, TAKÁTS Annamária, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DIBÓ György, HIDASI Eszter, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Parkinson’s disease is a promising target of applying personalized medicine. For this purpose it is crucial to reveal the genetic and environmental factors, which contribute to the disease, also to collect epidemiologic data and to preserve the patients samples and data in a proper biobank. In our investigation we examined the prevalence of the most frequent Parkinson’s disease causing LRRK2 G2019S mutation in a Hungarian Parkinson-patient group. From 120 patients, we haven’t detected this substitution in anyone. Our investigation suggest that the mutation LRRK2 G2019S may be a rare cause of Parkinson disease in the Hungarian population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Hungarian experiences with the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale

CZEGLÉDI Edit, SZABÓ Kornélia

Background and purpose - Sociocultural influences regarding bodily appearance and their psychological consequences play a considerable role in the development and maintenance of body image disturbance and eating disorders. The purpose of the study was to explore the psychometric properties of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised and its correlates among young adults in Hungary. Methods - In our cross-sectional online study, participants were 18-35 years old (N=820, 40% male). Measures: self-reported anthropometric data, Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised, Eating Disorder Inventory, SCOFF questionnaire, Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Results - The exploratory factor analysis showed that the fit indices of the three-factor solution are acceptable (c2(171)=5124.8, p<0.001, CFI=0.944, TLI=0.918, RMSEA=0.054, SRMR=0.030). Along the original ‘Importance of being thin’ and the ‘Importance of being fit’ factors, a third factor emerged, namely the ’Life fulfilment aspect of attractiveness’ factor. Internal consistency and construct validity of the scales were confirmed. Among those who were at risk of developing an eating disorder, all of the measured beliefs were significantly greater than among those who were not at risk (thin: Z=6.501, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.63, fit: t(818)=-4.749, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.41, and life fulfilment: t(239)=-5.702, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.53). Conclusion - The Hungarian version of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised is a reliable, valid measure and we suggest its introduction into Hungarian research. Relationships between beliefs about attractiveness and self-esteem, body image and eating disorders suggest intervention opportunities in with regards to prevention and treatment of eating disorders.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson’s disease: a review]

BEREZNAI Benjámin, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.]