Clinical Neuroscience

[Treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with PMMA augmented pedicle screw fixation]

PADÁNYI Csaba, MISIK Ferenc, PAPP Zoltán, VITANOVICS Dusan, BALOGH Attila, VERES Róbert, LIPÓTH László, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

JANUARY 30, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(01-02)

[Background - Over the last few decades many innovative operation technique were developed due to the increase of porotic vertebral fractures. These new techniques aim to reach the required stability of the vertebral column. In case of significant instability, spinal canal stenosis or neural compression, decompressive intervention may be necessary, which results in further weakening of the column of the spine, the minimal invasive percutan vertebroplasty is not an adequate method to reach the required stability, that is why insertion of complementary pedicular screws is needed. Considering the limited screw-fixing ability of the porotic bone structure, with this new technique we are able to reach the appropriate stability of cement-augmented pedicle screws by dosing cement carefully through the screws into the vertebral body. We used this technique in our Institute in case of 12 patients and followed up the required stability and the severity of complications. Methods - Fifteen vertebral compression fractures of 12 patients were treated in our Institute. Using the classification proposed by Genant et al. we found that the severity of the vertebral compression was grade 3 in case of 13, while grade 2 in case of two fractures. The average follow up time of the patients was 22 months (12-39), during this period X-ray, CT and clinical control examinations were taken. During the surgery the involved segments were localised by using X-ray and after the exploration the canulated screws were put through the pedicles of the spine and the vertebral body was filled through the transpedicular screws with bone cement. Depending on the grade of the spinal canal stenosis, we made the decompression, vertebroplasty or corpectomy of the fractured vertebral body, and the replacement of the body. Finally the concerned segments were fixed by titanium rods. Results - In all cases the stenosis of spinal canal was resolved and the bone cement injected into the corpus resulted in adequated stability of the spine. In case of six patients we observed cement extravasation without any clinical signs, and by one patient - as a serious complication - pulmonary embolism. Neurological progression or screw loosening were not detected during the follow up period. Part of the patients had residual disability after the surgery due to their older ages and the problem of their rehabilitation process. Conclusion - After the right consideration of indications, age, general health condition and the chance of successful rehabilitation, the technique appears to be safe for the patients. With the use of this surgical method, the stability of the spine can be improved compared to the preoperative condition, the spinal canal stenosis can be solved and the neural structures can be decompressed. The severity of complications can be reduced by a precise surgical technique and the careful use of the injected cement. The indication of the surgical method needs to be considered in the light of the expected outcome and the rehabilitation.]

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[Extending therapeutic possibilities in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: dimethyl fumarate]

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[Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a novel oral therapy that has recently been approved for the treatment of relapsing- remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dimethyl fumarate shows anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties that are thought to be mediated primarily via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 - Nrf2 transcriptional pathway, which up-regulates the genes involved in the cellular response to oxidative stress. The drug was evaluated in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, multicentric, multinational, 2-year, phase III clinical trials. The DEFINE and CONFIRM trials, conducted with over 2600 adult patients suffering from RRMS, unequivocally confirmed the efficacy of DMF (2×240 mg daily) in reducing the annualized relapse rate (ARR) and reducing the proportion of patients with MS relapse at 2 years. Significantly reduced sustained disability progression was observed with the drug versus placebo in DEFINE, while the same tendency was seen in CONFIRM. The MRI results of the studies were also convincing: DMF significantly reduced the number of new/enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions and the number of Gd-enhancing lesions compared to placebo. Dimethyl fumarate was generally well tolerated and no safety concern has been raised. Adverse events that occurred most frequently included flushing and gastrointestinal events. The long- term efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate is currently being investigated in the ENDORSE trial, with interim results demonstrating the same results as the two previous studies. In conclusion, although further, mostly comparative data are needed to fully establish the relative efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate compared with other therapies, dimethyl-fumarate is a valuable addition to the therapeutic options available for RRMS.]

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[The efficacy of lacosamide in relation to antiepileptic drug history. Clinical experiences in adult partial epilepsy]

BARCS Gábor, SZŰCS Anna, HORVÁTH András, KAMONDI Anita

[Objective - A retrospective study in adult partial epilepsy on the efficacy of lacosamide in relation to previous antiepileptic drug experiences. Method - We analysed 3-65 months’ data on epilepsy-care of 43 pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy patients treated with lacosamide. Further analysis of antiepileptic drug history was carried out in strictly selected subgroups of patients with good and poor therapeutic response to lacosamide (10 and 9 patients, respectively) for 2-10 years long retrospective follow up. Patients - Adult patients with partial-onset seizures had been treated previously with three or more lifetime antiepileptic drugs without permanent success. Results - Six patients (14%) were seizure free, eleven patients (25%) have experienced important improvement (their seizure-frequency decreased by at least 50%) for more than 12 months. Fourteen patients (32%) improved for less than 6 months and then have relapsed; and add-on lacosamide proved ineffective in 12 patients (28%). Those selected 10 patients successfully treated with lacosamide (seizure free for at least six months) favourably responded to carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine earlier and levetiracetam was ineffective or even caused worsening. The selected lacosamide-unresponsive nine patients responded unfavourably to carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine earlier. Fifteen patients (35%) suffered side effects as dizziness or sleepiness, in 11 of them lacosamide was combined with a „traditional” sodium-channal blocker antiepileptic drug. Conclusion - Lacosamide is an effective add-on antiepileptic drug in difficult-to treat adult partial epilepsy patients. Our data suggest that good lacosamide response may be expected in those patients who reacted favourably to „traditional” sodium-channel blocker carabamazepine or oxcarbazepine earlier.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Intraoperativ electrophysiological monitoring during neurosurgery on eloquent structures]

FEKETE Gábor, NOVÁK László, ERÕSS Loránd, FABÓ Dániel, BOGNÁR László

[Objective - We summarize our experiences on intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during neurosurgical procedures on eloquent neuronal structures. Patients, methods - Sixty patients were enrolled retrospectively in our study with pathologies involving eloquent neuronal structures. They were operated between May 2011. and March 2012. at the University of Debrecen, Department of Neurosurgery and at the National Institute of Neurosciences. Patients underwent standard preoperative examinations due to the primary pathology. In all cases we used intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. We had 22 cases with cranial nerve monitoring, 10 cases with cauda monitoring, 16 cases with motor system monitoring, six cases with complex spinal cord monitoring, three degenerative spine reconstructions and 3 awake surgeries. Results - We found that with the use of intraoperative electrophysiology we could make these neurosurgical procedures safer, and were able to optimize the extent of resection in the cases of oncological pathologies. Conclusions - Our experiences as well as the international literature suggests that in certain high risk neurosurgical procedures intraoperative electrophysiology is indispensible for safe and optimally extended operation.]

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[The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are systemic, chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by proximal symmetrical muscle weakness. One of the main diseases in this group is inclusion body myositis (IBM), an underdiagnosed, progressive muscle disease characteristically affecting the middle-aged and older population. It has a slow, relentlessly progressive course. The precise pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown. In most of the cases it is diagnosed a few years after the appearance of the first symptoms. The muscle biopsy typically shows endomysial inflammation, with invasion of mononuclear cells into the non-necrotic fibers, and also rimmed vacuoles. It appers, that both inflammation and degeneration are present at the onset of the disease. Our aim is to raise awareness about this disease which leads to severe disability, with clinicopathological case presentations and literature overview, emphasizing the importance of collaboration between the clinician and the neuropathologist. No effective therapy is currently available but the rapid diagnosis is essential to slow disease progression. Although this is a relatively rare disease, patients are presenting not only in immunology outpatient clinics; our reports aims to raise awareness and facilitate accurate early diagnosis of IBM. ]

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