Clinical Neuroscience

[THE ROLE OF TREMOROMETRY IN PREDICTING THE OUTCOME OF ABLATIVE SURGERIES]

KOVÁCS Norbert, BALÁS István, ILLÉS Zsolt, KELLÉNYI Lóránt, NAGY Ferenc

NOVEMBER 30, 2006

Clinical Neuroscience - 2006;59(11-12)

[Ablative neurosurgical interventions are widely used for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. However, in some cases, the achieved result is temporary and repeat operation is necessary to obtain a permanent effect. By analyzing 30 ablative surgeries using comparative accelerometry, we looked for a biological marker predicting the efficiency. In 27 cases where clinical symptoms were permanently improved, a significant increase in rest tremor frequency was observed in addition to reduction in tremor intensity. In contrast, in those three cases where the clinical effect of the surgery was only temporary, the frequency of tremor remained unchanged despite of the transitory decrease in intensity. We thus hypothesize that postoperative change in frequency of tremor but not the intensity may predict the outcome of ablative treatments.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[THORACIC MENINGOCELE]

FEKETE Tamás Fülöp, VERES Róbert, NYÁRY István

[Herniation of the meninges through a defect of the spinal canal is a spinal meningocele, and is usually located dorsally in the lumbosacral region. Meningoceles are usually part of a complex developmental disorder, or of a systemic disease, or it can be iatrogenic, as well. We report a very rare case of a true anterior thoracic meningocele.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[AMYOTROPHIC LATERALSCLEROSIS IN COUNTY BARANYA, HUNGARY]

MERKLI Hajnalka, NAGY Ferenc, PÁL Endre, GÁTI István, KOVÁCS Norbert, KOMOLY Sámuel, ILLÉS Zsolt

[Amyotrophic lateralsclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease resulting in loss of upper and lower motoneurons. Here we analyzed the clinical and epidemiological data of 202 ALS patients admitted to our department between 1950 and 2004. Risk and protective factors influencing onset and progression of the disease were examined. We also analyzed the relationship between first clinical symptoms/signs and prognosis of the disease. Our data suggest the importance of toxic factors in the initiation of the disease and the effect of clinical phenotype on the progression of ALS.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE MODULATORY EFFECT OF ESTROGEN ON THE CAUDAL TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS OF THE RAT IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF MIGRAINE]

VARGA Hedvig, PÁRDUTZ Árpád, TAJTI János, VÉCSEI László, JEAN Schoenen

[Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorder affecting up to 14% of the population. The disease shows sexual dimorphism, thus gonadal steroids may play an important role in its patophysiology. One model of migraine headache is the systemic administration of nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroglycerin (NTG), which triggers a delayed attack without aura in many migraine patients but not in healthy volunteers. NTG is also able to activate the neurons of the caudal trigeminal nucleus in the rat. In our review we summarise the effect of NTG on the expression of some molecules, in the superficial laminae of the spinal portion of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, which play an important role in the pathomechanism of headaches, and the modulatory effect of chronic estradiol treatment. Our data show that NTG was able to modify all the examined substances in the caudal trigeminal nucleus, while chronic estradiol treatment abolished this effect. These data may help to understand the mechanisms by which estrogens influence trigeminal nociception and how nitric oxide triggers migraine attacks.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[EPIDEMIOLOGY OF STROKE IN THE ELDERLY]

POZSEGOVITS Krisztián, KAZUO Suzuki, NAGY Zoltán

[Background - In the industrialized countries the very elderly stroke patient is more frequent than before. For the time being Japanese people have the highest expected lifespan, so the epidemiological features of stroke in the very elderly can be examined here quite easily. From a few publications with low case number it is known that in this group of patients the statistical characteristics of stroke is remarkably different from the youngers' one. Subjects and methods - The subjects aged 85 or more years were selected from the Akita Stroke Registry with first-ever acute stroke from 1996 to 1998. Results - 8,046 cases were recorded. There were 7362 patients aged <85 years, and 684 patients aged ≥85 years (8.5%). Sex ratio (women/men) was 1.89 in the two age groups. In the population of Akita the crude incidence of firstever stroke was 222/100,000/year, and 1,085/100,000/year in the very elderly, who were characterized with relatively lower prevalence of stroke risk factors, except that of atrial fibrillation (26.9%) and cardiac diseases (34.2%). The stroke subtype distribution (cerebral infarction 73.2%, intracerebral haemorrhage 20.6%, subarachnoidal haemorrhage 6.1%) was significantly different from the one known in Japan. Mortality rates were considerably high, especially in the SAH group. The most powerful prognostic factor of death was the consciousness level at onset. The following in order of predicting value was the SAH stroke subtype. Conclusion - While people aged 85 years or more had relatively lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, they suffered stroke with very high frequency, the evolved cerebrovascular event caused very severe symptoms and led to death with high rate. Implicitly this is illuminating the complexity of aging as a procession, furthermore it raises the importance of prevention, more rather of the acute stroke care and rehabilitation in this high age group.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL FACIAL PALSY]

ILNICZKY Sándor

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Vestibular evoked myogenic potential responses in Parkinson’s disease

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Clinical Neuroscience

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DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Efficacy of deep brain stimulation in our patients with Parkinson’s disease]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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[The 123I-FP-CIT dopamine transporter SPECT imaging is a sensitive method to assess functional dopaminergic neuron terminals in the striatum. The method has also been available in Hungary for years. There are two main indications: (i) to help differentiate essential tremor from clinically uncertain Parkinsonism, including patients with early symptoms and (ii) to help differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this paper is to review 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging based on international data/guidelines and our own experiences, thereby assisting nuclear medicine practitioners and neurologists.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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[The prevalence of major and minor depression in Parkinson’s disease is around 30-40% but, unfortunately, depression remains frequently underrecognized and often undertreated. However, recognition and appropriate treatment of depression in patients with Parkinson’s disease is essential for improving the cross-sectional picture and longitudinal course. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and different treatment modalities of depression in Parkinson’s disease.]