Clinical Neuroscience

The effect of psychiatric comorbidities and stress-coping strategies on perceived quality of life in migraine

PETROVICS-BALOG Anna1, MAJLÁTH Zsófia1, LUKÁCS Melinda1, HOLCZER Adrienn1, MUST Anita1,2, TAJTI János1, VÉCSEI László1,3

NOVEMBER 30, 2019

Clinical Neuroscience - 2019;72(11-12)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.72.0397

Purpose – Migraine is one of the most disabling primary headache conditions. We aimed to detect hidden symptoms of anxiety and depression and to survey stress-coping mechanisms and related quality of life in a large migraine population without any known psychiatric comorbidity. Method – 123 migraine patients (MG) and 66 healthy subjects (HC) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (S-STAI and T-STAI), the Stress and Coping Inventory (SCI) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results – MG patients reached significantly higher scores on the BDI-II and the T-STAI yielding previously undetected anxiety and depression symptoms. Significant differences were present on the SCI: higher stress scores and lower coping levels suggested impaired stress-coping strategies in migraine. MG patients achieved significantly lower scores on most of SF-36 subscales indicating lower perceived quality of life. Significant correlations were found between BDI-II, T-STAI, SCI scores and subscales of the SF-36. Conclusion – Unrecognized symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as less effective stress-coping strategies might be related to the lower perceived quality of life in migraine. The screening of these symptoms might lead to more focused and efficient therapeutic strategies. Addressing stress management techniques could improve quality of life on the long-term.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Centre, University of Szeged, Szeged
  2. Department of Cognitive and Neuropsychology, Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Szeged, Szeged
  3. MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, Szeged

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Clinical Neuroscience

Vestibular evoked myogenic potential responses in Parkinson’s disease

CICEKLI Esen, TITIZ Pinar Ayse, TITIZ Ali, OZTEKIN Nese, MUJDECI Banu

Background - Our objectives were to determine the differences in the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses in patients diagnosed with early staged idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to the normal population and evaluate the vestibular system disorder causing balance-posture disorders. Second aim of this study was to investigate caloric test responses particularly in early staged PD compared to normal popu­lation. Material and methods - Thirty patients (14 females and 16 males; mean age, 60.6 ± 13.1 years) diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 28 healthy subjects (20 males and 8 females; mean age, 59.1 ± 6.4 years) were included. The patient and control groups were subdivided according to their age, gender and the patient group was subdivided according to onset time of the Parkinson symptoms, Hoehn-Yahr staging. The subgroups were compared for VEMP and caloric test responses. Results - There were no significant differences between the study and control groups for right and left VEMP measurements. Patients over 60 years and under 60 years did not show significant differences in terms of right and left mean VEMP measurements. However, P1 amplitude was significantly lower in patients over 60 years old (P = .004). Gender, disease duration, BERG balance scale and Hoehn-Yahr stage had no effect on the VEMP amplitudes. There was no significant correlation with the side of Parkinsonian symptoms to the side of canal paresis (P = .566) and the side on which no VEMP response was obtained in caloric test. Conclusion - VEMP responses were not different between PD and healthy subjects. VEMP P1 amplitude was decreased with age in PD group. Canal paresis and symptoms side were not statistically correlated in caloric test.

Clinical Neuroscience

Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Early experience with CyberKnife treatment in case of intra-, suprasellar hypernephroma metastasis]

SIPOS László, BAJCSAY András, KONTRA Gábor, CZIRJÁK Sándor, JÁNVÁRY Levente, FEDORCSÁK Imre, POLGÁR Csaba

[Among tumours found in the suprasellar region metastases are very rare and the most frequent primary tumours are lung and breast cancer. Data of a patient with clear cell renal carcinoma with intra-suprasellar metastasis will be discussed. As in most of the tumours in the sellar region, the first symptom was visual deterioration with visual field defect. A transsphenoidal debulking of the tumour was performed and the residual tumor was treated by CyberKnife hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Both our patient’s visual acuity and visual field impairment improved after the surgery and CyberKnife treatment. At 6-month after irradiation, MR of the sella showed a complete remission of the tumour. This was the first treatment with CyberKnife in our country in case of a tumour close to the optic chiasm. According to our best knowledge, there are 21 cases in the literature with renal cell carcinoma metastasis in the suprasellar region.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The applicability of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT dopamine transporter imaging in clinical practice]

PERLAKI Gábor, SZEKERES Sarolta, JANSZKY József, DEZSŐ Dániel, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, ZÁMBÓ Katalin, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The 123I-FP-CIT dopamine transporter SPECT imaging is a sensitive method to assess functional dopaminergic neuron terminals in the striatum. The method has also been available in Hungary for years. There are two main indications: (i) to help differentiate essential tremor from clinically uncertain Parkinsonism, including patients with early symptoms and (ii) to help differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this paper is to review 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging based on international data/guidelines and our own experiences, thereby assisting nuclear medicine practitioners and neurologists.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Utilization of acute vascular imaging and neurointervention for acute ischaemic stroke patients in 20 Hungarian stroke centers

POZSEGOVITS Krisztián, SZABÓ Géza, SZUPERA Zoltán, NAGY Péter, NÉMETH László, KONDÁKOR István, TUSA Csaba, BERENTE László, SALACZ Pál, VÉCSEI László, SAS Katalin, SEMJÉN Judit, NIKL János, SZAPÁRY László, KAKUK Anikó, RÓZSA Csilla, HORVÁTH Melinda, IMRE Piroska, KÖVES Ágnes, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Sándor, FOLYOVICH András, AL-MUHANNA Nadim, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Katalin Anna, HAHN Katalin, KRISTÓF Piroska, SZÁSZ Attila Sándor, SZŰCS Anna, BERECZKI Dániel

Background - Acute mortality rate of stroke in Hungary is significantly higher than in Western Europe, which is likely to be partially attributable to suboptimal treatment. Subjects and methods - We examined the use of acute vascular imaging and mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischaemic stroke patients. We collected data on 20 consecutive patients from Hungarian stroke centres before 31st August 2016. Results - Out of the reported 410 patients, 166 (40.4%) underwent CT angiography and 44 (10.7%) had mechanical thrombectomy. Conclusion - Only about 1/3 of acute ischaemic stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy actually had it. The underlying reasons include long onset-to-door time, low utilization of acute vessel imaging and a limited neuro­intervention capacity needing improvement.

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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