Clinical Neuroscience

[The complex intensive care and rehabilitation of a quadriplegic patient using a diaphragm pacemaker]

FODOR Gábor1, GARTNER Béla1, KECSKÉS Gabriella1

JULY 30, 2020

Clinical Neuroscience - 2020;73(07-08)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.73.0269

[A 21 year female polytraumatized patient was admitted to our unit after a serious motorbike accident. We carried out CT imaging, which confirmed the fracture of the C-II vertebra and compression of spinal cord. Futhermore, the diagnostic investigations detected the compound and comminuted fracture of the left humerus and femur; the sacrum and the pubic bones were broken as well. After the stabilization of the cervical vertebra, a tracheotomy and the fixation of her limbs were performed. She spent 1.5 years in our unit. Meanwhile we tried to fix all the medical problems related to tetraplegia and respiratory insufficiency. As part of this process she underwent an electrophysiological examination in Uppsala (Sweden) and a diaphragm pacemaker was implanted. Our main goal was to reach the fully available quality of life. It is worth making this case familiar in a wider range of public as it could be an excellent example for the close collaboration of medical and non-medical fields.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Petz Aladár Megyei Oktató Kórház, Központi Aneszteziológia és Intenzív Terápiás Osztály, Gyôr

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Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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