Clinical Neuroscience

The changing face of neuroscience

LORD WALTON of Detchant1

JANUARY 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(01-02)

This paper is based upon three lectures one given in Australia in a symposiom in honour of Professor James Lance on his retirement, another delivered to the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences on 26 January 1993 and published in the procceedings of that annual symposium of the Academy. It is reproduced here with permission.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Former Professor of Neurology and Dean of Medicine, University of Newcastle upon Tyne. former Warden and Honorary Fellow, Green College, Oxford, President, World Federation of Neurology

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