Clinical Neuroscience

Surgery of vertebro-basilar aneurysms re-evaluated

VAJDA János1, NYÁRY István1, CZIRJÁK Sándor1, HORVÁTH Miklós1

MAY 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(05-06)

It has long been a common view of the world's neurosurgical community that saccular aneurysms located at the junction of bilateral vertebral arteries where the basilar artery arises from (VB aneurysm) impose extreme diffuculties to their surgical repair. These difficulties have been agreed to be caused by the narrowest working space for dissecting and clipping the aneurysm, while structures around this particular location with their vital functional importance are most sensitive to retraction. The difficulties have been apparently amplified when the aneurysm had recently ruptured because of further limits in mobilizing aneurysm, vessels and attached surfaces. As the experiences of our aneurysm surgery team in the National Institute of Neurosurgery have increased, our attitude toward these lesions used to be called no-man’s-land aneurysms have gained more and more confidence and this is felt as the right time to report our results.

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  1. National Institute of Neurosurgery, Budapest, Hungary

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