Clinical Neuroscience

Stress-induced corticosterone rise maintain gastric mucosal integrity in rats

LUDMILA Filaretova, MARINA Myazina, TATIANA Bagaeva

SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

Clinical Neuroscience - 2016;69(09-10)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.69.0313

Background - To investigate contribution of glucocorticoids to the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity during stress we predominantly used ulcerogenic stress models. Using these models we demonstrated that glucocorticoids released in response to the ulcerogenic stimuli attenuated their harmful action on the gastric mucosa. Purpose - In the present study we hypothesized that mild stressors does not damage the gastric mucosa due to gastroprotective action of glucocorticoids released in response to these stressors. Methods - To verify the hypothesis the effects of normally non-ulcerogenic mild stimuli (15-30 min cold-restraint) on the gastric mucosal integrity have been studied under the circumstances of inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenocortical axis in rats. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis was inhibited by: 1) fast inhibitory action of metyrapone, inhibitor glucocorticoid synthesis; 2) fast inhibitory action of NBI 27914, the selective antagonist of cortricotropin- releasing factor receptor type 1; 3) delayed inhibitory action of a single pharmacological dose of cortisol injected one week before the onset of stress stimulus. Results - Each of these pretreatments significantly decreased 15-30 min cold-restraint-produced corticosterone levels: 37.2±1 vs 22.5±1.2 (p<0.05) after metyrapone; 52.1±0.9 vs 41.4±1 (p<0.05) after NBI, and 64.2±4.2 vs 16.7±1.5 (p<0.05) after cortisol pretreatment. The inhibition of stress-induced corticosterone rise resulted in an ap - pearance of gastric lesions after the onset of these mild stressors in rats. Conclusions - The results suggest that in rats with inhibited stress-induced corticosterone rise normally non-ulcerogenic stimuli are transformed into ulcerogenic ones and confirm the hypothesis. The findings further support for the point of view that glucocorticoids released during acute stress are gastroprotective factors.

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Dissections of the supraaortic arteries]

CSEH Tamás, SZUKITS Sándor, SZAPÁRY László

[Dissection of the cervical and intracranial vasculature is a rare but important cause of ischaemic stroke especially in young adults. In the majority of cases it affects the extracranial vessels, mostly the internal carotid artery. It might be categorized as spontaneous or traumatic, causing diverse clinical symptoms. Dissection might lead to ipsilateral stroke mainly by artery-to-artery embolisation. Due to its relative rarity compared to the classic ischaemic stroke of the elderly, there are much less clinically relevant information for the clinician to rely on. Several large, randomised, multicentered, prospective studies and some smaller, retrospective analyses have been published recently concerning the genetic background, epidemiology, acute care and secondary prevention of supraaortic arterial dissection which helps the neurologist to provide evidence-based care for his patient. Our aim is to give a short, up-to-date overview of arterial dissections with two case reports.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in pain research]

ÉDES Andrea Edit, JUHÁSZ Gabriella

[Functional imaging studies opened a new way to understand the neural activity underlying pain perception and the pathomechanism of chronic pain syndromes. In the last twenty years several results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been published about examining the different aspects of complex pain experience. The aim of these studies is to understand the functioning of the pain control system, the so-called pain matrix, activated by acute nociceptive stimulus. Another important field of pain research is the investigation of neuronal processes underlying chronic pain, since the pathomechanism of this is still unclear. Our review aims to provide insight into the methods of pain research using fMRI and the achievements of the last few years.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Adult attachment and parental bonding in irritable bowel syndrome and in panic disorder - Implications for psychotherapy

PÉNZES István, CZEGLÉDI Edit, SZALAI Dömötör Tamás, CSALA Irén, TÚRY Ferenc

Background and purpose - Attachment theory provides an integrative perspective about the interplay between cognitive, affective, behavioral and interpersonal processes and is relevant for understanding irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and panic disorder (PD). The aim of the present study was to examine the adult attachment style and parental bonding of IBS and PD patients. Methods - In a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study, 65 PD and 65 IBS patients with clinical diagnosis participated. Measures were Attachment Style Questionnaire, Experiences in Close Relationships Scale - Revised, and Parental Bonding Instrument. Results - The frequencies of insecure attachment (80.0% vs. 63.1%) and paternal neglect (35.4% vs. 16.9%) were higher in IBS than in PD (χ2 (1)=4.571, p=0.033, and χ2 (3)=7.831, p=0.050, respectively). The frequency of secure attachment was significantly higher for optimal paternal bonding than with suboptimal paternal bonding (75.0% vs. 21.9%, χ2 (1)=19.408, p<0.001). According to the results of multiple binary logistic analysis, optimal paternal bonding predicted secure attachment after adjusting for the background variables (OR=9.26, p=0.001). Conclusion - A high frequency of insecure attachment was present in both groups, especially in IBS. With regard to maternal bonding, IBS and PD groups showed similar patterns, while an apparent difference was observed for paternal bonding. These highlighted the developmental similarities of these two, symptomatically different disorders. While optimal maternal bonding did not predict adult attachment security, paternal bonding did thus replete with therapeutic implications. Attachment functions, like responsiveness, attunement and affection modulation were apparent in the psychotherapist-patient relationship as well.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cerebral vasomotor reactivity in fibromyalgia patients and its relationship to central neuropathic pain

GULER Sibel, KURTOGLU S. Hakan, KEHAYA Sezgin, PAMUK Nuri, CELIK Yahya

Background - Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, defined as the cerebral vasculature response to hypoxia, is not wellunderstood in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. This study investigated the difference in the cerebrovascular reactivity (i.e., responsiveness to hypercapnia was evaluated by use of breath- holding index) to the breath-holding index (BHI) between patients with fibromyalgia and a group of normal controls. Methods - The study included 40 FM patients and 40 healthy subjects. Cerebrovascular reactivity was evaluated using the BHI, which is a nonaggressive, well-tolerated, real-time, reproducible screening method to study cerebral haemodynamics. Insonation depth and basal velocity were symmetrical and not significantly different between the two groups (p>0.05). All patients completed the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), visual analogue scale (VAS), and the somatization subscale of the SCL-90-R symptom checklist. Results - The BHI ranged from 0.30 to 2.20 (mean 1.11±0.45) in the FM patients and 1.10 to 2.80 (mean 1.90±0.35) in the control group (p<0.001). Disease duration and right BHIaverage and left BHIaverage values exhibited a significant negative correlation (r=-0.877; p<0.001, r=-0.842; p<0.001, respectively). As pain and fatigue scores increased, the right BHIaverage and left BHIaverage values decreased (r=-0.431; p=0.005, r=-0.544; p<0.001, r=-0.341; p=0.031, r=-0.644; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions - BHI values showed that cerebrovascular reactivity in FM patients decreased in comparison to healthy individuals. BHI decreased as disease duration and severity increased. Cerebrovascular reactivity decreased in FM patients, and this phenomenon should be accepted as an abnormality. Additionally, this outcome may have been the result of a mechanism responsible for central neuropathic pain.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Operation - rehabilitation - employment]

MÉSZÁROS Gabriella, FEHÉR Miklós, BORBÉLY Csaba

[In this article we would like to bring the attention to the importance of early rehabilitation, coordinated operation of different subdivisions of rehabilitation and the expanding opportunities after medical care through following a 38- year-old female patient's case who was operated 6 years ago with anaplasticus oligodendroglioma. We find it important that the experts working on the field of health care, social services or labour should be aware of the possibilities of rehabilitation of their patients from the capability assessment, through its development until their placement in integrated labour market. It is important, that even during the medical care both the client and their relatives receive proper information.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The role of neurohormonal regulation in the development of insulin resistance in chronic stress]

MOLNÁR Ildikó

[The effects of the chronic stress could not be avoided recently. The pathognomic regulation of the neurohormonal events is responsible for the manifestation of diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, depression, tumors, inflammations, allergy. Two major regulatory systems are involved in the neuroendocrine alterations caused by stress: the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous systems. The chronic activation of the adrenocortical system leads to insulin resistance and obesity associating with vascular, arteriosclerotic and inflammatory symptoms. The revealing of the pathognomic events on time and the enhanced physical activity may provide the effective prevention of these frequent diseases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Acute and chronic stress induced changes in gene transcriptions related to Alzheimer’s disease]

SÁNTHA Petra, PÁKÁSKI Magdolna, FAZEKAS Örsike, SZŰCS Szabina, FODOR Eszter Klára, KÁLMÁN János ifj., KÁLMÁN Sára, SZABÓ Gyula, JANKA Zoltán, KÁLMÁN János

[Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that stress may be implicated in the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our study aimed to investigate the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (IS) on the gene transcriptions of β-actin, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mitogen activated protein kinase-1 (MAPK-1), proteins related to synaptic plasticity and neuronal degeneration. Male Wistar rats were exposed to IS for five hours daily for 3 days (acute stress) or through 7-14-21 days (chronic stress). At the end of exposure periods, total RNA was purified from the cortex and hippocampus. The amounts of β-actin, APP and MAPK-1 mRNA were determined with real time PCR method. Our results indicate that the mRNA expression of β-actin and APP followed a U-shaped time-response curve. Both acute and chronic IS caused a significant increase in β-actin and MAPK-1 mRNA expression. Significant APP mRNA elevation was observed only by the 3rd week after RS. Our findings demonstrate that both acute and chronic IS lead to gene transcriptional changes of β-actin, APP and MAPK-1. These proteins maintain the normal function of the cytoskeleton and the synaptic plasticity. The above changes may lead to cognitive deterioration, and the development of AD.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[A PSYCHIATRIST’S PERSPECTIVES ON STRESS, STEROIDS AND MENTAL ILLNESS]

DUNAI Magdolna

[The relationship between stress and mental illness has been extensively studied and there is a growing consensus that the occurrence of mental illness rather depends on a combination of factors than is caused by stressful external events. Significant hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis abnormalities were observed among others in major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. In both disorders, the extent of change in cortisol level was related to the severity of illness and to cognitive changes. Exogenous use of synthetic steroids also frequently resulted in severe psychiatric symptoms. In conclusion changes in the level of steroid hormones may cause impairments in the brain.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Oxytocin as a neurotransmitter: beyond the peripheral scope]

VARGA Katalin

[Besides its effect on the uterus and breasts, oxytocin also regulates affiliative behaviour. The so-called central oxytocin effect influences pair bonding, maternal care and attachment through the regulatory functions of oxytocin that acts as a neurotransmitter within the brain. The central oxytocin effect increases trust and social support, decreases fear and anxiety, and promotes wound healing. These effects form the basis of the stress-triggered, oxytocin-based ‘calm and connection’ reaction. Some methods that are widely used in modern obstretric practice - such as the use of synthetic oxytocin for inducing or speeding up labour or epidural anaesthesia - hinder the psycho-emotive effects that are based on natural oxytocin. Epigenetic studies performed in animals indicate that the oxytocin effect experienced at birth can be transgenerational.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF DR. HANS SELYE AND OF HIS INSTITUT DE MÈDECINE ET DE CHIRURGIE EXPÈRIMENTALES (IMCE)]

MILAGROS Salas-Prato

[This article is a short personal recollection of Dr. Hans Selye (HS) and of his institute in order to show, first, why and how he influenced us; second, who he was as a person, human being, physician, scientist, professor, mentor; third, what was the structure and functioning of the Institut de mèdecine et chirurgie expèrimentales (IMCE) and fourth, what HS’ contributions and accomplishments were.]