Clinical Neuroscience

[Statement of Hungarian Epilepsy League]

JANSZKY József

MARCH 25, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Measuring of functional impairment of lumbal spine]

VALASEK Tamás, VARGA Péter Pál, KLEMENCSICS István, SZÖVÉRFI Zsolt, BOZSÓDI Árpád, ÉLTES Péter Endre, LAZÁRY Áron

[Background and purpose - The purpose of our study was to outline the Hungarian validation process of the Oswestry Disability Index, the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Core Outcome Measurement Index, as well as to draw up recommendations regarding their future applications. Methods - The Hungarian versions were brought to life after a cultural and linguistic adaptation. Next to the above-mentioned questionnaires, the questionnaire booklet used for validation also contained the WHOQoL-BREF general quality of life questionnaire and a pain measuring Visual Analog Scale. The data of low-back pain patients were registered twice in two weeks. We determined the internal homogeneity (Cronbach alpha), reproducibility, standard error of measurement and the minimal detectable change of the questionnaires. Patients were assigned into different two subgroups (surgical / non-surgical, with / without affection of nerve roots) and differences between the subgroups were examined with the help of the questionnaires. We determined the physical subscale of the WHOQoL-BREF and the correlation between the pain and the studied questionnaires. Results - The value of Cronbach alpha was between 0.85 and 0.95. All four questionnaires showed significant differences (p<0.001) between the subgroups. The correlation studies brought strong and significant results (p<0.001, r>0.5) in every case. The values of reproducibility were between 0.93-0.92. The results of standard measurement error: 4.8 (Oswestry), 5.2 (Quebec), 1.6 (Roland-Morris), 0.59 (Core Index). The minimal detectable change was 13; 14; 4, and 2 points, respectively. Conclusion - The Hungarian versions of all four questionnaires are valid. They can be applied with scientific certainty to measure low back pain patients. From the studied questionnaires, we especially recommend the wide-raging application of the Oswestry Disability Index and the Core Outcome Measurement Index based on their psychometric and application features. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Proconvulsive effect of antiepileptic drugs]

KELEMEN Anna

[Antiepileptic drugs can provoke and worsen seizures, what is called paradoxical effect. Paradoxical seizure worsening can occur as a nonspecific manifestation of drug intoxication in number of antiepileptic drugs. The other type is a specific type, when antiepileptic drugs with pure GABAergic and sodium channel blocker mechanism of action provoke myoclonic, absence and atonic seizures in specific epilepsy syndromes, mainly in idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Antiepileptic drug-induced exacerbation of seizures is a common, often unrecognized clinical problem, which can be avoided by a careful syndromic diagnosis and by using broad spectrum antiepileptic drugs.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Do previous offences predict violent acts in psychiatric patients? A retrospective study in Hungary]

BARAN Brigitta, SZABÓ Ádám Ferenc, KARA Borbála, KOVÁCS Magdolna, UZONYI Adél, ANTAL Albert, UNGVARI S Gabor, GAZDAG Gábor

[Aim - To investigate the presence of offences in the previous past history of perpetrators of violent acts who have undergone forced medical treatment. Methods - The documentation of all patients released over a 10-year period from the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry (IMEI) was reviewed. A comparison was drawn between patients who were convicted of any type of offense before the violent act (patients with previous offences-PPO) and those who were not (patients with no previous offences-PNO). Results - Eighty-six (29%) and 208 (71%) patients formed the PPO and PNO groups, respectively. Prior contact with psychiatric services was significantly higher in the PPO group (p=0.038) and this group was also more likely to offend under the influence of a psychoactive substance (p<0.001). Exceptional brutality and other qualifying factors were more frequent in the PNO group (p=0.019). Conclusion - As IMEI is the only forensic institution in Hungary, the picture presented here reflects the situation in the entire country. A recidivism rate of 29% is within the internationally published range. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Lack of associations between CLU and PICALM gene polymorphisms and Alzheimer’s disease in a Turkish population]

SEN Aysu, ARSLAN Mehtap, ERDAL Emin Mehmet, AY Izci Ozlem, YILMAZ Gorucu Senay, KURT Erhan, ARPACI Baki

[Background and purpose - To investigate the association between the rs11136000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the clusterin (CLU) gene, the rs541458 and rs3851179 SNPs of the phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) gene and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in a Turkish population, and to determine whether there are any relationships between the CLU and the PICALM genotypes and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in the Turkish population. Methods - One-hundred and twelve AD patients and 106 controls were included in this study. BPSD were evaluated by the Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD). SNPs in the CLU and the PICALM gene were genotyped by Real-Time PCR. Genotype distributions were assessed for the groups of patients and controls, for the patient groups with and without each BPSD, and “No BPSD” and “BPSD”. Results - The CLU and the PICALM genotypes were similar in the AD and control subjects, and the groups with and without each BPSD. There were also no significant differences between the “No BPSD” and the “BPSD” groups for the PICALM genotypes, but even without a statistical significance, it is notable that none of the “No BPSD” patients had genotype pattern CLU-rs11136000-TT, and the female subjects with genotype pattern CLU-rs11136000-TT had higher mean score of BEHAVE-AD. Conclusion - This study claims that investigated SNPs are not genetic risk factors for AD in a Turkish population. In addition, the rs541458 and rs3851179 of PICALM SNPs are not related to development of BPSD, but the rs11136000 of CLU SNP might be related to development of BPSD in AD female Turkish subpopulation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Genetic polymorphisms of human beta-defensins in patients with multiple sclerosis]

SZEKERES Márta, SOMOGYVÁRI Ferenc, BENCSIK Krisztina, SZOLNOKI Zoltán, VÉCSEI László, MÁNDI Yvette

[Aims - Recent studies have started to elucidate the contribution of microbiome to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). It is also supposed, that neuropathological alterations might be associated with abnormal expression and regulatory function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including defensins. It is in our interest to investigate the relevance of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the DEFB1 gene and the copy number polymorphism of the DEFB4 genes in MS. Methods - DEFB1 polymorphisms: c.-20G > A (rs11362), DEFB1 c.-44C > G (rs1800972), DEFB1 c.-52G>A (rs1799946), and the DEFB4 gene copy number were investigated in 250 MS patients The control patients comprised 232 age- and gender-matched healthy blood donors. The occurrence of the human b-defensin 2 peptide (hBD2) in the plasma of controls and patients was determined by ELISA. Results - The DEFB1 c.-44C>G polymorphism the GG protective genotype was much less frequent among patients than among the controls. A higher frequency of a lower (<4) copy number of the DEFB4 gene was observed in the patients with MS as compared with the controls (43% vs. 28%, respectively). The median levels of the circulating hBD2 in the patients were 150.6±12.71 pg/ml vs. 262.1±23.82 pg/ml in the control group (p<0.0001). Our results suggest that b-defensins play role in the development of MS.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Clinical Neuroscience

The yield of electroencephalography in syncope

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, TAN Ozturk Ozlem

Introduction - Syncope is defined as a brief transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Although the diagnosis of syncope is based on a thorough history and examination, electroencaphalography (EEG) is also an important investigational tool in the differential diagnosis in this group of patients. In this study we aimed to identify the diagnostic value of EEG in patients with syncope. Methods - We retrospectively examined EEG recordings of 288 patients with the diagnosis of syncope referred to the Cankiri State Hospital EEG laboratory, from January 2014 to January 2016. The EEG findings were classified into 6 groups as normal, epileptiform discharges (spike and sharp waves), generalized background slowing, focal slowing, hemispherical asymmetries, and low amplitude EEG tracing. The EEGs were separated according to gender and age. Results - Total of 288 patients were included in this study, 148 were females (51.4%) and 140 (48.6%) were males. Among all the EEG reports, 203 (70.5%) were normal, 8 of them (2.8%) showed generalized background slowing and 7 (2.4%) demonstrated focal slow waves. Epileptiform discharges occured among 13 patients (4.5%). Hemispherical asymmetries were detected in 10 patients (3.5%) and low amplitude EEG tracing in 47 patients (16.3%). There was no significant difference between age groups in EEG findings (p=0.3). Also no significant difference was detected in EEG results by gender (p=0.2). Discussion - Although the diagnosis of syncope, epilepsy and non-epileptic seizures is clinical diagnosis, EEG still remains additional method