Clinical Neuroscience

[Sexological problems in neurological disorders: neurosexology]

GYURIS Jenő

OCTOBER 20, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(09-10)

[The author has examined this complex subject-matter as he has not found any publications dealing with the interconnection between neurology and sexuality in the Hungarian literature available to him. Healthy sexual behavior determines the individual’s quality of life. This, however requires a coordinated, complex functioning bound to very complex structures and their unimpaired functions: peripheral receptor→ peripheral nerve→radix→spinal cord→ definite, functionally interrelated structures of the brain (prae-optic areas, hypothalamus, amygdala, limbic system and the cerebral cortex, mainly the orbitofrontal area). The functioning of these structures and the healthy sexuality are also influenced by steroid hormones, neurochemical regulations, neurotransmitters, the monoamin system, opioids, GABA, neuroendocrine hormones (oxytocin, prolactin, gonadotrop realising hormone). The author deals in detail with the impairment for some reason of neurological structures participating in sexuality, which may lead to sexual dysfunctions. ]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[The effect of autogenic training combined with organ formula and motion therapy on spontaneus and provoked headaches]

ZSOMBÓK Terézia

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pompe’s disease - Part II - Treatment strategies and enzyme replacement]

ILLÉS Zsolt, VÁRADI VISY Katalin

[Pompe’s disease is an ultra-orphan disease caused by the deficiency of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. At present, it is the only inherited muscle disorder, which can be treated by replacement of the enzyme. Three international randomized trials examined the clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in infantile and late-onset diseases. ERT reduced the risk of death, respiratory support, invasive ventilation and improved cardiomyopathy. Respiration, muscle function and quality of life were improved in both infantile and late-onset diseases. These randomized and pilot trials also proved the safety of the treatment. At present it is not clear if antibodies induced by ERT result in decreased efficacy. In this review, we also discuss our experiences obtained by the treatment of three patients, and review the spectrum of supportive and experimental treatment strategies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Actigraphy: A valuable diagnostic tool or a luxury investigation? (Neuropsychiatric aspects)]

RAJNA Péter, SZOMSZÉD Anita

[Aim - Despite of the continuing interest in actigraphy it has a relatively low impact on the everyday medical routine. Accordingly, we set out to review the current state and to recommend relevant further indications for its application, especially in neuropsychiatry. Method - We surveyed the areas of its use and then reviewed the literature, with special regard to its advantages and methodological limitations. Adding to the results we enlarged the results with our own personal experience. Results - The limitations of the method may be decreased by methodological manipulations (a simple rational data reduction is recommended). Actigraphy appears to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of illnesses, syndromes or disorders influencing the vigilance level, the motor performance or the energetic balance of the organism. We constructed a list of the most relevant fields of indication of actigraphy in diagnostics, illustrated by anecdotal actigraphic case records. Conclusion - Further methodological considerations are needed for the successful evaluation of accelerometry. Targeted basic epidemiological studies in the healthy population and in patient groups should solve various open questions in order to make full use of the advantages of actigraphy in the everyday clinical routine.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the scientific meeting of the Környey Society in 2009]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The endometriosis in the focus]

KOVÁCS Zsuzsanna, VÁRADYNÉ HORVÁTH Ágnes, KOZMANN Krisztina, FERENCZY Mónika, PAKAI Annamária

[Aim of the research was to investigate the deeply infiltrating endometriosis disease perioperative changes impact on the quality of life and on the sexuality. Research and sampling methods: A retrospective, partly longitudinal research, following surgery document analysis (n = 61) and we made a processing of the individually structured questionnaire with standard elements. We used 15D to measure the quality of life and MFSQ standard questionnaire to measure the sexuality (n=44). We calculated relative and absolute frequency, mean, standard deviation, paired t-test, χ2- test, correlation and one way analysis of variance (p<0,05) with the help of the SPSS 22. program. Results: 73.8% of the patients had at least 3 organ with endometriosis involvement and 82,5% were removed by laparoscopic surgery. The length of stay showed an upward turn tendency in the context of the complications (p <0.001). The sample vitality and sexual relations 40,9% were characterized by no complaint and between sexual partners and satisfaction (r = 0.442, p = 0.003) and between orgasm and sexual partners (r = 0.518, p = <0.001) medium correlation were detected. Conclusions: The surgery was efficient in the treatment of the DIE, but there are no detectable correlation the positive perception of sexual satisfaction. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Correction of the physiological artefacts at pre-surgical clinical functional MR]

KISS Máté, GÁL Andor Viktor, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, MARTOS János, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction/aim of the study - Pre-surgical functional MRI (fMRI) is an important modality of examinations before brain surgery. There are several artefacts (e.g. motion, susceptibility) which may hinder the evaluation of fMRI data. Physiological artefacts (breathing, pulsation) also affect the sensitivity and specificity of anatomical localization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficiency of physiological artefact identification and removal methods for presurgical evaluation. Materials and methods - Siemens Magnetom Verio 3T MRI scanner was used to collect data. The physiological parameters (breathing, pulse) were recorded with the MRI system’s built-in devices. Data from fourteen patients - with primary brain tumour - were evaluated with SPM12 utilizing the RETROICOR/RVHR tool to detect and decrease the effect of physiological artefacts. We compared the statistical maps obtained with and without the physiological correction using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, and ROI analyses. Results - Significant differences were found in the mean ROI values (p<0.0016) and the extensions of eloquent activations (p<0.0013), when using the physiological correction (RETORICOR/RVHR) based on convolution method. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between the ROIs’ standard deviations (F=0.28). The RETROICOR/ RVHR method helps to define the precise localisation of eloquent areas (p<0.009). The number of irrelevant (non-significant) voxels were increased (p<0.001). Conclusions - Minimising of physiological artefacts in fMRI data calculations, the (RETROICOR/RVHR) method based on convolution has been successfully adapted. This algorithm could be helpful before neurosurgical intervention. The activity pattern became more reliable. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.