Clinical Neuroscience

[Reports]

MÁRIA Béla, TÖRÖK István

AUGUST 01, 1965

Clinical Neuroscience - 1965;18(08)

[1. Report on the XXVIII Italian Psychiatric Congress 2. Lindauer Psychotherapiewoche. 3-8 May 1965]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Diagnostic and aetiological problems in bridge lesions]

LEHOCZKY Tibor

[The importance and frequency of bridge lesions have been known since Kubik and Adams (1946).In my presentation I will focus on vascular and tumoral bridge lesions. I will only briefly refer to the other aetiological factors. Of my eight clinicopathological cases, 5 are anaemic or haemorrhagic infarcts, 3 are tumours; of these, 2 are intrapontine and 1 extrapontine. Of the 5 infarctus cases, symptoms developed acutely in 3 patients and subcutaneously in 2. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Bruxism and chronic headache]

VÁRADY Géza

[1. After describing the symptomatology and literature of bruxism (teeth grinding, empty grinding), the author investigated its relationship with chronic headache based on his own experience with patients. 2. "Bruxism cephalea" is a myogenic pain localized to the masticatory muscles, which aetiopathogenetically can be divided into psychogenic and orthodontogenic groups. 3. 19 out of 21 cases were dominated by psychogenitas, in which psychotherapeutic, sedative, general and local relaxation treatment resulted in the resolution of the typical complaints. In two cases orthodontic, stomatological sanatio resolved the irritative situation, secondary masticatory spasm. 4. In cases of chronic head and facial pain that defy any treatment, the possibility of bruxism, its pathogenetic role and the involvement of the stomatognathic system should be considered. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Data for the topochemistry of the Bielschowsky-type family of blind idiocy]

BALAJTHY Béla

[In two brothers with late infantile typus amaurotic idiopathy, regional differences in the amount and composition of complex lipoid material stored in neurons were detected. For example : the lam. granularisa of the cerebellar cortex is almost intact, Purkinje elements represent the only cell type stored in its dendrites, the nucl. The thematic differences in the qualitative composition of the stored material are illustrated by a comparison of Purkinje and spinal cord motor neurons ; in the dendrites of Purkinje elements an alcohol-soluble glycolipid is stored, in the cell body the same material is found bound to protein and traces of sphingomyelin. In the motile cells of the spinal cord, the free glycolipid is minimal ; in these, mainly protein-bound glycolipid and sphingo myelin are stored. The regional behaviour of storage is identical in the two siblings, but there are important differences from most of the cases reported in the literature. These features suggest that, in addition to the common pathological moments that define the disease type, there are also variable topochemical endowments that appear to be familially determined. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hypnotic suggestibility and delusions of suggestibility in schizophrenic patients]

J. Nicsev

[1. suggestibility, the most typical hypnotic symptom, is also a feature of schizophrenia (as a chronic hypnotic state) 2. In hypnosis, the influence of real stimuli is established by psychological substitution 3. Substitution is characterized by a lower degree of unconsciousness of temporary relationships. It has associative, evocative, or visceral significance. 4. Substitution is the basis of suggestibility. 5. Hypotonicity of consciousness leads to regression of associations to the degree of substitution, the activity becomes automatic and creates a sense of being uninfluenced. 6. The patient's resistance to suggestion under conditions of increasing negativism becomes automatic resistance, and in negativism, it manifests itself in delusions of suggestion through personification ideas. 7. In schizophrenic patients, the suggestibility mechanism takes place at a lower level and is related to the pathophysiological essence of the disease, the chronic hypnotic state. ]

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Comparison of direct costs of percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar lumbar discectomy and microdiscectomy: Results from Turkey

ÜNSAL Ünlü Ülkün, ŞENTÜRK Salim

Microdiscectomy (MD) is a stan­dard technique for the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Uniportal percutaneous full-endoscopic in­terlaminar lumbar discectomy (PELD) is another surgical op­tion that has become popular owing to reports of shorter hos­pitalization and earlier functional recovery. There are very few articles analyzing the total costs of these two techniques. The purpose of this study was to compare total hospital costs among microdiscectomy (MD) and uniportal percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar lumbar discectomy (PELD). Forty patients aged between 22-70 years who underwent PELD or MD with different anesthesia techniques were divided into four groups: (i) PELD-local anesthesia (PELD-Local) (n=10), (ii) PELD-general anesthesia (PELD-General) (n=10), (iii) MD-spinal anesthesia (MD-Spinal) (n=10), (iv) MD-general anesthesia (MD-General) (n=10). Health care costs were defined as the sum of direct costs. Data were then analyzed based on anesthetic modality to produce a direct cost evaluation. Direct costs were compared statistically between MD and PELD groups. The sum of total costs was $1,249.50 in the PELD-Local group, $1,741.50 in the PELD-General group, $2,015.60 in the MD-Spinal group, and $2,348.70 in the MD-General group. The sum of total costs was higher in the MD-Spinal and MD-General groups than in the PELD-Local and PELD-General groups. The costs of surgical operation, surgical equipment, anesthesia (anesthetist’s costs), hospital stay, anesthetic drugs and materials, laboratory wor­kup, nur­sing care, and postoperative me­dication diffe­red significantly among the two main groups (PELD-MD) (p<0.01). This study demonstrated that PELD is less costly than MD.

Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurological aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus]

BERECZKI Dániel, STANG Rita, BÖJTI Péter, KOVÁCS Tibor

[By the spring of 2020 the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has become a pandemic, requiring fast and efficient reaction from societies and health care systems all over the world. Fever, coughing and dyspnea are considered the major signs of COVID-19. In addition to the involvement of the respiratory system, the infection may result in other symptoms and signs as well. Based on reports to date, neurological signs or symptoms appear in 30-50% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, with higher incidence in those with more severe disease. Classical acute neurological syndromes have also been reported to associate with COVID-19. A drop in the volume of services for other acute diseases has been described in countries with healthcare systems focusing on COVID-19. During the COVID-19 epidemic it is also important to provide appropriate continuous care for those with chronic neurological disorders. It will be the task of the future to estimate the collateral damage caused by the COVID-19 epidemic on the outcome of other neurological disorders, and to screen for the possible late neurological complications of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Chronic form of Pisa syndrome after prolonged exposure to low-dose amisulpride treatment

ERDEM Şimşek Nazan, ÖZKAYNAK Sibel Sehur

Pisa syndrome is a movement problem defined by tonic, sustained lateral flexion with a slight posterior rotation of the trunk. It seems to be a side effect of antipsychotic medicine in most cases. The clinical duration of Pisa syndrome can be acute, chronic, or recurrent. As far as we know, no reports are available in the literature on the chronic form of Pisa syndrome caused by low-dose amisulpride. A case of refractory tardive dystonia form of Pisa syndrome during treatment with stable low-dose amisulpride is presented in this report. Long-term, low-dosage amisulpride therapy may induce tardive dystonia even in patients with no other risk factors for dystonia.

Clinical Neuroscience

Uric acid: The role in the pathophysiology and the prediction in the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease: A Turkish-based study

ARI Cagla Buse , TUR Kobak Esma , DOMAC Mayda Fusun , KENANGIL Ozgen Gulay

Oxidative stress has been associated as an essential contributor to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent developments in the field of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) pathophysiology have led to a renewed interest in this field. As an antioxidant, uric acid (UA) has arisen as a potential neuroprotectant. Higher concentrations of UA are linked to reducing the risk of the development of the disease and preventing its progression. However, the expositions are unsatisfactory because the outcomes of these reports have not been consistent. This study is set out to assess the association of whether lower UA concentrations increased the PD risk by investigating its relationship with patients’ demographic and clinical data, and to determine whether previous studies are compatible with the Turkish-sampled population. Furthermore, we aimed to determine UA’s probability of being an early-stage diagnostic marker. A total of 305 patients and 100 healthy controls were included. Serum UA levels of patients and controls were compared with clinical features. We classified the patients into three motor subtypes and determined the disease severity by modified Hoehn&Yahr Staging Scale (mH&Y) and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-TR) was assessed for cognition. There were not any significant differences of age and sex between patients and controls (p=0.030, p=0.132). The mean UA was 5.06±1.33 mg/dL in patients and 5.46±1.44 in controls, and a statistical significance was detected (p=0.022). The mean MMSE-TR were 24.83±4.35 in patients and 27.09±2.13 in controls, and statictical significance was revealed (p=0.001). The mean duration of the disease was 6.31±4.16 years, mean UPDRS scores were 59.74±22.33, and mH&Y scores were 2.29±0.91. In binary comparisons, patients with tremor-dominant motor subtype had lower UA concentrations than controls (p=0.014). ROC curve analysis revealed UA’s cut-off as ≤9.15, the specificity was 99.3, the sensitivity was 10.0, and the area under the curve was 0.576 (p<0.005). Regression analysis revealed age as an independent risk factor on UA values. Oxidative stress might be a factor in the development of PD, and UA may be a possible prospective protecting factor in the clinical course of the disease. However, it does not affect the severity. Our results support that lower uric acid concentrations are associated with PD; however, it is not a powerful indicator for predicting PD risk. As we reveal more about UA and its effect in further investigations, its significant role will become well-defined.