Clinical Neuroscience

[Myositis of the eye muscles]

GALLAI Margit1

OCTOBER 01, 1969

Clinical Neuroscience - 1969;22(10)

[The author describes two cases of chronic orbital cellulitis with myositis. He reviews the clinical forms of orbital myositis, the names and classifications used in the literature, differential diagnostic methods and therapeutic options. ]

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  1. Orvostovábbképző Intézet Ideggyógyászati Tanszéke

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Choosing how to explore in lumbar hernia operations, based on 373 cases over four years - 1965-1968]

ANDRÁSOFSZKY T., MÁTHÉ Á., NAGY P., ROTH Gy., KOMJÁTSZEGI S., SZABÓ Á., KISGYÖRGY Á.

[It is the authors' understanding that the most important criteria for the successful surgical treatment of lumbar hernias are the correct indication and timing of surgery, avoidance of myelography, minimal bone resection, but always complete root decompression. These criteria were applied in 373 operations between 1965 and 1968, with inter-arch exploration in 87.64% of cases. The situations which make each type of exploration possible or necessary are analysed. It is stressed that inter-arch exploration can be used to remove hernias causing cauda-unusual hernias and that this method of exploration can also be used in reoperations. ]

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