Clinical Neuroscience

[Mobilization of cholesterol in the brain]

LÁSZLÓ János1, SCHULLER Dezső1, GAÁL Magda1

SEPTEMBER 17, 1952

Clinical Neuroscience - 1952;5(03)

[1. Our studies have shown that brain cholesterol can enter the bloodstream and raise blood cholesterol levels.2. In relation to brain death, cholesterol can enter the bloodstream in four ways. a, We found fat granule cells in the brain capillaries and dural sunus. Thus, these cells can also enter the vasculature. b, In the dural sinuses, we could detect fat globules that give a double refraction. c, Near the brain beds, we found fat in the endothelial cells of the capillaries. The endothelium of the capillaries plays an important role in brain cholesterol transport. d, In degenerative processes of the central nervous system, large numbers of corpus amylaceum containing double refracting fats are often found. Their entry into the blood may contribute to elevated blood cholesterol levels.]

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  1. Budapest Orvostudományi Egyetem I. Kórbonctani és Kísérleti Rákkutató Intézet

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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