Clinical Neuroscience

[Isolated thenar atrophy caused by circumferential cervical spondylarthrosis]

KLEIN Magda1

NOVEMBER 01, 1966

Clinical Neuroscience - 1966;19(11)

[The author reviews the literature on isolated thenar atrophy caused by circumscribed osteochondrosis, and then describes three typical cases of his own. He draws attention to the diagnostic, differential-diagnostic and therapeutic significance of knowledge of the pathology. therapeutic importance. He discusses the putative local facilitating factors for the development of the pathology.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Budapest XIII. ker. Róbert Károly krt. Kórház Organikus Idegosztálya

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Past and present trends in schizophrenia and depression outcomes]

VARGA Ervin, HAITS Géza

[Using the matched pares technique, 4X123 (total: 492) medical histories from different years were processed from the BOTE Psychiatric Clinic charts.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[About CSF plasma cells]

PÉTER Ágnes

[ The author analyses the morphological and functional aspects of plasma cells detected in meningograms of 60 cases with inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. Among the shape variants of the plasma cells, he isolated immature cell types that appeared in the cerebrospinal fluid. The young cell shapes of the CSF plasmocytes suggest a leptomeningeal origin of CSF plasma cells. The author found plasmocytic cytological reactions in the CSF of two patients, an accumulation of blast-type cells, secret-vacuolum-like lesions in the plasma cells and highly elevated gamma-globulin values. It raises the possibility that the plasma cells detected in CSF are immunoreactive and play a role in the production of CSF antibodies.Analysis of meningograms from 30 panencephalitic patients and CSF protein spectra from 18 cases revealed that leptomeningeal plasma cells were mainly involved in the production of CSF antibodies. s migrating gamma fractions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Data on the effectiveness of group therapy with chronic schizophrenics]

SÜLE Ferenc, SÜLE Ferencné

[The authors report an evaluation of a 30-session group therapy process with chronic psychotic patients. The assessment was conducted using clinical medical and nurse observations, repeatable body procedures, and a systematic recording of group session communication developed by the authors. Their study shows that as few as 30 therapy sessions are useful for resocializing patients and they see the potential of systematic recording to enable further research and understanding of group dynamics as significant.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[J131-labelled Human Serum Albumin myelographies]

TAKÁCS Piroska

[Describes a myelographic method for HSA with J131. He considers the test to be of good value for initial orientation in suspected spinal stenosis, emphasising the fact that the test does not render other diagnostic procedures unnecessary. He agrees with Ljasz that the method is well suited to localising the site of spinal stenosis, but does not provide differential diagnostic assistance in determining the quality of the process. A major advantage of the method is its safety. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Familial peripheral nervous system damage of compression origin]

PÉLEY Domokos

[The author describes two families in which multiple peripheral nervous system lesions, mainly peroneal nerve palsy, have been observed. The nerve lesions were almost always caused by prolonged rigid postures (kneeling, squatting, arm flexion). The prognosis of the disease is good, but recurrence is possible. It occurs mainly during agricultural work and can therefore be considered an occupational hazard. A congenital familial predisposition and nerve compression as a triggering factor may be involved. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection in far lateral lumbar disc herniations

EVRAN Sevket, KATAR Salim

Far lateral lumbar disc herniations (FLDH) consist approximately 0.7-12% of all lumbar disc herniations. Compared to the more common central and paramedian lumbar disc herniations, they cause more severe and persistent radicular pain due to direct compression of the nerve root and dorsal root ganglion. In patients who do not respond to conservative treatments such as medical treatment and physical therapy, and have not developed neurological deficits, it is difficult to decide on surgical treatment because of the nerve root damage and spinal instability risk due to disruption of facet joint integrity. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) on the improvement of both pain control and functional capacity in patients with FLDH. A total of 37 patients who had radicular pain caused by far lateral disc herniation which is visible in their lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, had no neurological deficit and did not respond to conservative treatment, were included the study. TFESI was applied to patients by preganglionic approach. Pre-treatment Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores of the patients were compared with the 3rd week, 3rd month and 6th month scores after the procedure. The mean initial VAS score was 8.63 ± 0.55, while it was 3.84 ± 1.66, 5.09 ± 0.85, 4.56 ± 1.66 at the 3rd week, 3rd month and 6th month controls, respectively. This decrease in the VAS score was found statistically significant (p = 0.001). ODI score with baseline mean value of 52.38 ± 6.84 was found to be 18.56 ± 4.95 at the 3rd week, 37.41 ± 14.1 at the 3rd month and 34.88 ± 14.33 at the 6th month. This downtrend of pa­tient’s ODI scores was found statistically significant (p = 0.001). This study has demonstrated that TFESI is an effective method for gaining increased functional capacity and pain control in the treatment of patients who are not suitable for surgical treatment with radicular complaints due to far lateral lumbar disc hernia.

Clinical Neuroscience

Atypical presentation of late-onset Sandhoff disease: a case report

SALAMON András , SZPISJAK László , ZÁDORI Dénes, LÉNÁRT István, MARÓTI Zoltán, KALMÁR Tibor , BRIERLEY M. H. Charlotte, DEEGAN B. Patrick , KLIVÉNYI Péter

Sandhoff disease is a rare type of hereditary (autosomal recessive) GM2-gangliosidosis, which is caused by mutation of the HEXB gene. Disruption of the β subunit of the hexosaminidase (Hex) enzyme affects the function of both the Hex-A and Hex-B isoforms. The severity and the age of onset of the disease (infantile or classic; juvenile; adult) depends on the residual activity of the enzyme. The late-onset form is characterized by diverse symptomatology, comprising motor neuron disease, ataxia, tremor, dystonia, psychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. A 36-year-old female patient has been presenting progressive, symmetrical lower limb weakness for 9 years. Detailed neurological examination revealed mild symmetrical weakness in the hip flexors without the involvement of other muscle groups. The patellar reflex was decreased on both sides. Laboratory tests showed no relevant alteration and routine electroencephalography and brain MRI were normal. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography revealed alterations corresponding to sensory neuropathy. Muscle biopsy demonstrated signs of mild neurogenic lesion. Her younger brother (32-year-old) was observed with similar symptoms. Detailed genetic study detected a known pathogenic missense mutation and a 15,088 base pair long known pathogenic deletion in the HEXB gene (NM_000521.4:c.1417G>A; NM_000521:c.-376-5836_669+1473del; double heterozygous state). Segregation analysis and hexosaminidase enzyme assay of the family further confirmed the diagnosis of late-onset Sandhoff disease. The purpose of this case report is to draw attention to the significance of late-onset Sandhoff disease amongst disorders presenting with proximal predominant symmetric lower limb muscle weakness in adulthood.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Assessing Quality of life of Women with Cervical Cancer After Treatment]

KOZMANN Krisztina, JÁNOSNÉ PÁNKI Roxána, FERENCZY Mónika, KOMLÓSI Kálmánné, KARÁCSONY Ilona

[To assess sexual function, functionality and quality of life in women with cervical cancer. Descriptive, cross-sectional, quantitative, non-random, purposive sampling of women (N=91) with FIGO stage I/II/III cervical cancer, more than 5 months after last treatment. The study used standard questionnaires with self-designed questions. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, descriptive and mathematical statistics (p<0.05). Completers who received radiotherapy scored significantly higher in functional status (p<0.05) and emotional function than those who did not receive radiotherapy (p<0.05). Completers with lower levels of emotional well-being were significantly more likely to have lower levels of sexual function and higher levels of gynaecological problems (p<0.05). Women affected by cervical cancer often experience somatic and psychological disturbances that reflect on quality of life associated with the disease and treatment.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[History of the development of wound care]

SZABÓNÉ Révész Erzsébet

[The onset of wound care dates back thousands of years. To make the wet wound treatment used today so effective can be a bumpy road. Knowledge of local processes required for wound care, mapping of the effectiveness of materials needed for wound care, treatment of bleeding suppression and traumatic shock caused by injury, destruction of pathogens entering the wound, ensuring optimal hygiene during wound care, treatment of the underlying disease in chronic wounds, all contributed to our ability to provide effective care today. The series of wars over the millennia have greatly aided the development of wound healing, as many developments are still known today that were already used by the army before they spread into everyday practice. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]