Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian Spine Association]

PENTELÉNYI Tamás

NOVEMBER 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(11-12)

[Summary of the 1993 Scientific Conference of the Hungarian Spine Society.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[In Memoriam György Bekény]

HORVÁTH Sándor

[After a life of struggle and success, and after a serious illness borne with dignity and discipline, death took him at the age of seventy-eight. Even in the last years of his life, ill but tireless, he served his vocation with his knowledge: healing and teaching; patients and interested students; the Clinic. Shortly before his death, he completed his last scientific work, The History of Hungarian Neurology.]

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[The illogical therapy]

KAMONDI Anita, SZIRMAI Imre, JUHÁSZ Csaba, SUREK György, MAGYAR Hedvig

[Most of the causative pathological factors in ischemic cerebrovascular events cannot be recognized during the acute stage of the disease partly because of to the complexity of biophysical model of cerebral microcirculation, partly because the causative factors in this model cannot be confidently weighted. Clinical diagnoses on cerebral circulation disorders are based on the fundamental causes of the disorders. Evoking factors are hypotheses, consequently therapies are directed to hypotheses. The mathematical model of cerebral microcircualtion is mondeterministic. The interactions between vascular factors and blood fluidity can be roughly estimated. Judging the therapeutic efficacy is hindered by the nondeterministic disease model, the indefinite clinical clues, their individual variations, heterogenous diagnostic groups, and tendency of spontaneous restoration of symptoms. Non-specific drugs are used to treat cerebral ischemia, and trials making use of monotherapies have failed to change the life expectancy or the clinical course of ischemic patients. The acute stage of the disease cannot be defined and because of the incompleteness of clinical indicators „stroke prevention" appeares to be ambiguious. Therefore, the nature of the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease is at present based on trial and error.]

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[Molecular characterization of the T cell receptor in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis - new therapeutical approaches]

KÁLMÁN Bernadett, LUBLIN D. Fred

[The authors review here the most recent literature on experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, focusing on the efferent branch of the immune response. They attempt to describe the molecular characteristics of the myelin antigen specific T cell receptors. Identification of the most distinct properties of the disease mediating cells may not only provide clues to the etiology of MS, but also opens new avenues to specific therapeutical approaches.]

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[Experimential allergic encephalomyelitis multiplex sclerosis!]

KAPÓCS Gábor

[T-lymphocytes and molecular engineering]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Transcranial doppler of extracranial stenosis in internal carotid artery]

NAGY Valéria, BEDŐ György

[Endeavours were made to determine why mean velocity and pulsatility index changes in middle and anterior cerebral artery are caused by the unilateral occlusion of the internal carotid artery or by severe stenosis. The transcranial Doppler method is suitable for judgingre pathologic intracranial blood flow conditions, especially when data are compared to those of healthy conditions.]

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Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

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Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

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[LAM 30: 1990–2020. Facing the mirror: Three decades of LAM, the Hungarian medicine and health care system]

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[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

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[The Comprehensive Aphasia Test in Hungarian]

ZAKARIÁS Lilla, RÓZSA Sándor, LUKÁCS Ágnes

[In this paper we present the Comprehensive Aphasia Test-Hungarian (CAT-H; Zakariás and Lukács, in preparation), an assessment tool newly adapted to Hungarian, currently under standardisation. The test is suitable for the assessment of an acquired language disorder, post-stroke aphasia. The aims of this paper are to present 1) the main characteristics of the test, its areas of application, and the process of the Hungarian adaptation and standardisation, 2) the first results from a sample of Hungarian people with aphasia and healthy controls. Ninety-nine people with aphasia, mostly with unilateral, left hemisphere stroke, and 19 neurologically intact control participants were administered the CAT-H. In addition, we developed a questionnaire assessing demographic and clinical information. The CAT-H consists of two parts, a Cognitive Screening Test and a Language Test. People with aphasia performed significantly worse than the control group in all language and almost all cognitive subtests of the CAT-H. Consistent with our expectations, the control group performed close to ceiling in all subtests, whereas people with aphasia exhibited great individual variability both in the language and the cognitive subtests. In addition, we found that age, time post-onset, and type of stroke were associated with cognitive and linguistic abilities measured by the CAT-H. Our results and our experiences clearly show that the CAT-H provides a comprehensive profile of a person’s impaired and intact language abilities and can be used to monitor language recovery as well as to screen for basic cognitive deficits in aphasia. We hope that the CAT-H will be a unique resource for rehabilitation professionals and aphasia researchers in aphasia assessment and diagnostics in Hungary. ]