Clinical Neuroscience

[High resolution sonography for the examination of peripheral nerves in vascular neuropathy]

JOSEF Böhm

JULY 22, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(07-08)

[High-frequency sonography is a new method for the imaging of the peripheral nerves. In vasculitic neuropathy, pain or axonopathy can often prevent the lesion to be localized during electrophysiological examinations. There are only few informations in the literature about the ability of the sonography for localizing lesions in vasculitic neuropathy. High-frequency sonography helped in our two cases of mononeuritis multiplex and two cases of distal-symmetric polyneuropathy to put the diagnosis of a vasculitic neuropathy and was able to detect focal morphologic lesions which could not be identified electrophysiologically due to the axonopathy.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Expert opinion on opioid therapy of non tumorous pain]

EMBEY-ISZTIN Dezső

[Expert opinion on opioid therapy of non tumorous pain 2009;62(07-08)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Dezső Embey-Isztin: Pain relieve]

KOMOLY Sámuel, NAGY Ferenc

[Dezső Embey-Isztin: Pain relieve 2009;62(07-08)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Current medical aspects of pantethine (in English language)]

HORVÁTH Zoltán, VÉCSEI László

[Pantethine, the stable disulfide form of pantetheine, is the major precursor of coenzyme A, which plays a central role in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. Coenzyme A is a cofactor in over 70 enzymatic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, carbohydrate metabolism, pyruvate degradation, amino acid catabolism, haem synthesis, acetylcholine synthesis, phase II detoxification, acetylation, etc. Pantethine has beneficial effects in vascular disease, it able to decrease the hyperlipidaemia, moderate the platelet function and prevent the lipid-peroxidation. Moreover its neuro-endocrinological regulating role, its good influence on cataract and cystinosis are also proved. This molecule is a well-tolerated therapeutic agent; the frequency of its side-effect is very low and mild. Based on these preclinical and clinical data, it could be recommended using this compound as adjuvant therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pompe’s disease - Part I - Pathogenesis and clinical features]

ILLÉS Zsolt, TRAUNINGER Anita

[Pompe’s disease is an ultra-orphan disease caused by the deficiency of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. At present, it is the only inherited muscle disorder, which can be treated by replacement of the enzyme. According to the natural course, early infantile and late childhood-juvenile-adult cases are known. Respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and muscle hypotonia are cardinal symptoms/signs in infantile Pompe’s disease, while cardiomyopathy is absent in adult-onset cases. CK levels are always elevated in the sera of infantile patients. Hip-girdle dystrophy and orthopnoe should alert suspicion in adult patients. Diagnosis is established by decreased activity of the enzyme or mutational analysis. Muscle biopsy can be misleading in adult cases due to absence of glycogen in the examined specimen. In this review, we also discuss our experiences obtained by the treatment of three patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in childhood]

LIPTAI Zoltán, ÚJHELYI Enikő, MIHÁLY Ilona, RUDAS Gábor, BARSI Péter

[Background and purpose - Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a rare inflammatory demyelinating disorder often preceded by infection or vaccination. The purpose of the study was the systematic analysis of clinical, radiological and microbiological profiles of children treated at Szent László Hospital, and the comparison of findings with literature data. Methods - Demographic, infectological, clinical, radiological, laboratory and virological data of patients treated and followed-up between 1-Jan-1998 and 30-June-2008 were reviewed and analysed. Results - 19 children met diagnostic criteria. Their mean age was 6.8 years. A prodromal illness - mostly febrile viral infection, upper respiratory infection or chickenpox - preceded neurological symptoms in 17 patients. All had polysymptomatic encephalopathy, 2 children had spinal symptoms. The cerebrospinal fluid was abnormal in all but one. A viral etiology was definite in 7 and probable in 8 cases. MRI disclosed white matter changes in 18, cortical and deep gray matter in 16, cerebellar in 6, brain stem in 14 and spinal cord changes in 2 cases. Repeat MRI performed mean 4 months later showed complete resolution in 6 and partial resolution in 11 patients. 13 patients received high-dose methylprednisolone, 2 of whom were also treated with plasma exchange and 1 with immunoglobulin. 9 children required mechanical ventilation. 2 patients died, 10 recovered without and 7 with sequelae. 2 patients developed further demyelinating events: multiple sclerosis and multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis, respectively. Conclusion - Clinical, radiological and follow-up results were similar to those published in literature however, triggering viruses were identified in a larger proportion of cases.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hungarian Radiology

[High resolution sonography for the examination of peripheral nerves]

JOSEF Böhm

[High-frequency sonography is an important method for the imaging of the peripheral nerves, even though it is rarely used. For the examination of superficially located nerves, currently available transducers with frequencies between 12-17 MHz offer a better axial resolution than even MRI. Sonography is superior to MRI especially for the examination of nerves of the upper extremity. Main indications for the sonography of the nerves are entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries of the nerves, tumors, polyneuropathies and sonographically-guided interventions. The sensitivity of sonography and electrophysiology in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome are comparable. The combination of ultrasonography with electrophysiological studies increases the diagnostic yield in carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes. Sonography provides information for planning of peripheral nerve surgery and is helpful in evaluating postoperative complications. In selected cases, sonography can detect nerve lesions that require operative therapy earlier than electrophysiology. With technical enhancements, highfrequency ultrasonography is gaining increasing importance in the routine diagnostics of peripheral nerves lesions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Cases of inborn errors of metabolism diagnosed in children with autism

CAKAR Emel Nafiye, YILMAZBAS Pınar

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a heterogeneous presentation, the etiology of which is not clearly elucidated. In recent years, comorbidity has become more evident with the increase in the frequency of autism and diagnostic possibilities of inborn errors of metabolism. One hundred and seventy-nine patients with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder who presented to the Pediatric Metabolism outpatient clinic between 01/September/2018-29/February/2020 constituted the study population. The personal information, routine and specific metabolic tests of the patients were analyzed retrospectively. Out of the 3261 patients who presented to our outpatient clinic, 179 (5.48%) were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and were included in the study. As a result of specific metabolic examinations performed, 6 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed with inborn errors of metabolism. Two of our patients were diagnosed with classical phenylketonuria, two with classical homocystinuria, one with mucopolysaccharidosis type 3D (Sanfilippo syndrome) and one with 3-methylchrotonyl Co-A carboxylase deficiency. Inborn errors of metabolism may rarely present with autism spectrum disorder symptoms. Careful evaluation of the history, physical examination and additional findings in patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will guide the clinician in the decision-making process and chose the appropriate specific metabolic investigation. An underlying inborn errors of metabolism may be a treatable cause of autism.

Clinical Neuroscience

Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

Hypertension and nephrology

[About the care of patients with hyperuricaemia and gout]

[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]