Clinical Neuroscience

[Headache 1994 (some thoughts from the 2nd European Headache Conference)]

VÉCSEI László, TAJTI János, SAMSAM Mohtasham

SEPTEMBER 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(09-10)

[The purpose of this summary is to review some of the ideas from the 2nd European Headache Conference (Liège). 1. "From molecules to migraines" 2. Neurotransmitters and receptors in headache patients.]

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