Clinical Neuroscience

[Familiaris myasthenia]

CSORBA Antal 1

MARCH 23, 1950

Clinical Neuroscience - 1950;3(01)

[The significantly higher prevalence of the pathology among women, menstruation, natural or artificial menopause, the undoubted influence of pregnancy, persistent thymus, etc., demonstrate the aetiological importance of endocrine factors. It is probable that the so-called constitutional factor is nothing more than an as yet unknown disorder of the endocrine system and that it forms the basis of the chemical mediator disorder.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Budapesti Pázmány Péter Tudományegyetem Elme- és Idegkórtani Klinika

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Z. I.

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