Clinical Neuroscience

[Early mental test - developing a screening test for mild cognitive impairment]

KÁLMÁN János, PÁKÁSKI Magdolna, HOFFMANN Ildikó, DRÓTOS Gergely, DARVAS Gyöngyi, BODA Krisztina, BENCSIK Tamás, GYIMESI Alíz, GULYÁS Zsófia, BÁLINT Magdolna, SZATLÓCZKI Gréta, PAPP Edina

JANUARY 25, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(01-02)

[Background and purpose - Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogenous syndrome considered as a prodromal state of dementia with clinical importance in the early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease. We are currently developing an MCI screening instrument, the Early Mental Test (EMT) suitable to the needs of primary care physicians. The present study describes the validation process of the 6.2 version of the test. Methods - Only subjects (n=132, female 95, male 37) over the age of 55 (mean age 69.2 years (SD=6.59)) scoring at least 20 points on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), mean education 11.17 years (SD=3.86) were included in the study. The psychometric evaluation consisted of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the 6.2 version of EMT. The statistical analyses were carried out using the 17.00 version of SPSS statistical package. Results - The optimalised cut-off point was found to be 3.45 points with corresponding 69% sensitivity, 69% specificity and 69% accuracy measures. The Cronbach-α, that describes the internal consistence of the test was 0.667, which is higher as compared with the same category in the case of the ADASCog (0.446). A weak negative rank correlation was found between the total score of EMT 6.2 and the age of probands (rs=-0.25, p=0.003). Similarly, only a weak correlation was found between the education levels and the total score of EMT 6.2 (rs=0.31, p<0.001). Two of the subtests, the repeated delayed short-time memory and the letter fluency test with a motorical distraction task had significantly better power to separate MCI and control groups than the other subtests of the EMT. Conclusion - The 6.2 version of EMT is a fast and simple detector of MCI with a similar sensitivity-specificity profile to the MMSE, but this version of the test definitely needs further development.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[The significance of high-resolution ultrasonography in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders]

SCHEIDL Erika, JOSEF Böhm, FARBAKY Zsófia, DEBRECZENI Róbert, BERECZKI Dániel, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna

[High resolution ultrasonography is an emerging technique for the investigation of peripheral nerves and is increasingly used worldwide in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders, however, until now it is not widespread in Hungary. According to the literature this method is especially useful in entrapment neuropathies, traumatic peripheral nerve injuries, tumors of the peripheral nerves and sonographically guided interventions. Ultrasonography allows precise morphological analysis and quantitative measurements of the nerves providing useful complementary information to electrodiagnostic data. In entrapment neuropathies ultrasound shows nerve swelling mainly proximal to the sites of compression and a focal change of echotexture. On longitudinal scan, an abrupt caliber change and spindle-like swelling of the compressed nerve segment can be seen. Evaluation of the anatomical background and visualisation of the postoperative and posttraumatic changes provide useful information for planning of the therapy. Ultrasound may be of significant help in localizing the pathological nerve segment when it is at an electrophysiologically inaccessible site or when substantial secondary axonal loss precludes precise electrophysiological localization and it might even show pathological changes when nerve conduction studies are normal. Contrary to electrophysiological investigation ultrasonography might discover neurotmesis in the akute phase of traumatic nerve injuries indicating the necessity of surgical intervention. We provide a summary of the main indications and further application areas of this method.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial message]

KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás

[Editorial message 2013;66(01-02)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests]

VADÁSZ Dávid, SZTRIHA K. László, SAS Katalin, VÉCSEI László

[Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Blood lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities and hemorheological changes in autistic children]

LÁSZLÓ Aranka, NOVÁK Zoltán, SZÕLLÕSI-VARGA Ilona, HAI Quai Du, VETRÓ Ágnes, KOVÁCS Attila

[Objectives - Early infantile autism is a severe form of childhood psychiatric disease with characteristic symptoms. Hyperserotoninaemia in 43.5%, lactic acidosis 43% and hyperpyruvataemia in 30% were biochemically demonstrated in autistic children. Our earlier results led to the postulation that a disequilibrium in the blood redox is involved in infantile autism; the oxidative loading and the antioxidant defending enzyme system were investigated together with the hemorheological parameters in infantile autism. Methods - Malonyl-dialdehyde (MDA) endproduct of lipid peroxidation and activities of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (C-ase), glutathione peroxidase (GP-ase) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were biochemically determined from plasma and red blood cells. Patients - The antioxidant specificities were investigated in plasma and red blood cell haemolysate from 25 infantile autistic children. Results - Significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) (2.89 vs. 1.32 U/mg protein, p<0.01) and decreased glutathione peroxidase (0.620 vs. 0.910 U/mg protein, p<0.01) levels as well as catalase (0.463 vs. 4.948 BU/mg protein, p<0.001) activities were detected; while the plasma and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation and the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels did not change. The results of the investigated prooxidant and the antioxidant status provide evidence that there exists an oxidative stress in children with infantile autism. While investigating the hemorheological parameters of 25 infantile autistic patients, some characteristic pathological parameters were detected: the initial filtration rate (Fi) (0.72 vs. 0.75 p<0,01) and the clogging rate (CR) (1.926 vs. 2.912, p<0.01) values of red blood cells (RBC) decreased while the mean transit time (Tc) (8.93 vs. 7.39, p<0.001) increased suggesting reduced RBC deformability.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Experiences with a self developed accelerometer]

VÉR Csilla, HOFGÁRT Gergely, SZIMA Gábor, KOVÁCS GÁBOR, NYISZTOR Zoltán, KARDOS László, CSIBA László

[Objective - In neurology the objective evaluation of improvement of paresis on every-day practice. The aim of this study was to develope and test a small 3-d acceleration measuring device and validate its usefulness. Patients and methods - We collected data from 17 mild and medium severity hemiparetic, bedridden acute ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients and compared with data of 22 control subjects. The devices were attached to the paretic and non-paretic extremities and any movements (m/s2) and movement-durations were registered (24h). The data of movement-monitors were compared also with the changes of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and European Stroke Scale. The electromiograph-sensor of polysomnograph has been used for validation. Results - Mild differences could be found in the use of dominant and non-dominant upper extremities of control persons. The control persons used their upper extremities more frequently than the stroke patients. Our data showed significant correlation with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Higher values on the scores were accompanied with less intensive use of extremities. We found a correlation between the consiousness level of patients and their activity of upper extremities. If the patients had severe consiousness disturbances they used significantly less their upper extremities. Conclusion - Our device sensitively detected the movement-differences between paretic and non-paretic extremities and can be used for quantitative evaluation of patient's neurological and consciousness status.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer and non-Alzheimer dementias

BALÁZS Nóra , BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Investigating cognitive impairment in communities of practice – lessons learned]

VAJER Péter, JANCSÓ Zoltán, CSENTERI Orsolya, SZÔLLÔSI Gergô József, ANDRÉKA Péter

[In the “Three Generations for Health” programme, general practitioners were responsible for screening for dementia in their practices using mini-COG and Mini Mental State Examination. The aim was to present the screening results of those included, their assessment by the doctor and the further fate of the patients. After mini-COG test, MMSE test was performed in case of suspected dementia. The examiner categorized the result as abnormal or no abnormal, recorded the referral, and recorded the data in an online interface. Our study is a cross-sectional study; the evolution and distribution of the parameters described in the objectives are described with raw case numbers and proportions. Patients aged 55 years and over were recruited consecutively. Only those cases (29 730) where mini-COG and MMSE test results were available, their assessment by the physician, and referral data to specialist care were analyzed. The Mini-COG test revealed that 64% of the subjects were suspected of cognitive decline. Misclassification occurred in 13 015 cases, with 21% of the Mini-Cog test scores matching cognitive decline and 21% of lesions considered abnormal by GPs. The MMSE test raised the suspicion of dementia in 34% of the sample (10 174 people), with 4 262 (42%) of the participating GPs considering the result abnormal. 11% (2095 people) of people with abnormal Mini-Cog test scores and 17% (1709 people) of people with suspected dementia based on MMSE test scores were referred to specialist care. Our study assessed the practice of detecting cognitive decline in primary health care. The tools adopted for screening for dementia were used by practices, but the assessment of results and referral of suspected cases of dementia to specialist care were below the expected level. There is a need to improve primary care providers’ knowledge of dementia detection and treatment and to strengthen links with specialist care.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Diabetes, dementia, depression, distress]

SZATMÁRI Szabolcs, ORBÁN-KIS Károly, MIHÁLY István, LÁZÁR Alpár Sándor

[The number of people living with diabetes continues to rise. Therefore neurologists or other health care practitioners may be increasingly faced with comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders commonly presented by diabetic patients. More recently there has been an increasing research interest not only in the interactions between diabetes and the nervous system, the fine structure and functional changes of the brain, but also in the cognitive aspects of antidiabetic treatments. Patients with both types of diabetes mellitus may show signs of cognitive decline, and depression. Comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and distress may also occur. The bi-directional relationships between all these phenomena as well as their connection with diabetes can lead to further health and quality of life deterioration. Therefore it is important that all practitioners involved in the care of diabetic patients recognize the presence of comorbid neuropsychiatric disturbances early on during the healthcare process. Identifying higher risk patients and early screening could improve the prognosis of diabetes and may prevent complications.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[May measurement month: analysis of the Hungarian results of years 2017 and 2019]

NEMCSIK János, PÁLL Dénes, JÁRAI Zoltán

[Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are not only the leading causes of mortality in Hungary, but also the mortality rate is excessively high compared with the average of European Union, so screening programs identifying subjects with elevated blood pressure (BP) is of utmost importance. May Measurement Month (MMM) is an annual global initiative which began in 2017 aimed at raising awareness of high BP. Hungary, through the Hungarian Society of Hypertension has joined the campaign of MMM from the beginning. The results of years 2017 and 2019 are presented in this paper. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Pulmonary physiotherapy and aerobic exercise programs can improve cognitive functions and functional ability

TEKESIN Aysel, TUNC Abdulkadir, GÜNGEN Dogan Belma, AVCI Nalan, BAKIS Muhammed, PERK Seyma

Objective - The increasing prevalence of dementia over the previous decades has been accompanied by numerous social and economic problems. The importance of exercise in the prevention of dementia coupled with the impact of aspiration pneumonia on the mortality and morbidity of dementia patients cannot be overstated. This study investigates the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation combined with aerobic stretching exercises on the cognitive function, life quality, effort capacity, and level of depression in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the early stages of dementia. Methods - Sixty-nine patients with MCI diagnosis were routinely monitored, and six were excluded because they did not attend the follow-up appointments. The remaining 63 patients undertook pulmonary physiotherapy (PPT) and extremity exercises for six months. The mini-mental state examination (MMSE), six-minute walk test (6MWT), Nottingham health profile (NHP), and Beck depression inventory (BDI) scores were evaluated before and after exercise. Results - PPT plus extremity exercises appeared to significantly improve the MMSE scores and increase the 6MWT (p < 0.001) by an average of 25 m. No significant improvement was observed in the BDI and NHP scores. Conclusion - PPT and aerobic exercise positively affected the cognitive ability of MCI patients and improved their walking distance. These results underscore the importance of combining medical treatment with physical rehabilitation at the onset of dementia, a disease which exerts a significantly negative impact on the economy.