Clinical Neuroscience

Données neurophysiologiques concernant la maturation de l’hippocampe

PASSOUANT P.1

DECEMBER 01, 1967

Clinical Neuroscience - 1967;20(12)

En dehors des recherches neurophysiologiques sur l'ontogenèse corticale (Elligson, Purpura), l'ontogenèse des connexions sous-corticales-corticales est peu étudiée, à l'exception de la formatio reticularis (Scheibel). Dans son étude, l'auteur cherche à répondre à la question de savoir comment l'ontogenèse de l'organe ammonien se reflète dans l'activité électromotrice pendant le sommeil et l'éveil (1) et comment le processus de maturation de la décharge de l'organe ammonien se reflète dans l'activité épileptique (2). Matériel d'étude : 80 chats, âgés de quelques heures à 2 mois. Durée du test : de quelques jours à plusieurs semaines. Électrodes implantées en stéréotaxie dans le cortex et le sous-cortex. Traitement histologique du cerveau après la fin de l'expérience pour localiser les électrodes.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Faculté de Medicine, Montpellier

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