Clinical Neuroscience

[Depression in Parkinson’s disease]

RIHMER Zoltán, GONDA Xénia, DÖME Péter

JULY 30, 2014

Clinical Neuroscience - 2014;67(07-08)

[The prevalence of major and minor depression in Parkinson’s disease is around 30-40% but, unfortunately, depression remains frequently underrecognized and often undertreated. However, recognition and appropriate treatment of depression in patients with Parkinson’s disease is essential for improving the cross-sectional picture and longitudinal course. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and different treatment modalities of depression in Parkinson’s disease.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Natalizumab therapy, 2013]

KARÁCSONY Mária, BENCSIK Krisztina, VÉCSEI László

[Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic disease of the central nervous system in young adults. No curative therapy is known. Currently, six drugs are available that can reduce the activity of MS. The first-line drugs can completely reduce the activity of the disease in nearly two-thirds of the patients. In the remainder, who suffer from breakthrough disease, the condition of the patient worsens, and secondline therapies must be used. The second-line drug natalizumab exhibits almost double efficacy of the first-line drugs, but also have less favourable adverse effects. As a severe side-effect for instance, natalizumab carries the risk of the development of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), caused by a polyoma virus, the JC virus. There are three major risk factors for PML: an anti-JCV antibody status, a long duration of natalizumab treatment and prior immunosuppressant therapy. The lowest-risk group (1:14 286) comprises of patients who are anti-JCV antibody-negative, in whom the prior immunosuppressant use and duration of natalizumab therapy do not influence the risk of PML. With no prior immunosuppressant treatment, the incidence of PML increases to 1 in 192 patients after 2 years among those who are anti-JCV antibody-positive. These data may lead the physician to decide to discontinue natalizumab treatment. The half-life of natalizumab is three months; during this time other therapies can not be administered and the patients encounter the rebound effect: as the patients receiving natalizumab therapy displayed a high disease activity before treatment, the rebound effect can lead to relapses. After the termination of natalizumab secondline disease-modifying therapy with fingolimod may be introduce; no PML cases occur in response to fingolimod treatment. In the large majority of patients taking natalizumab who do not develop PML, this drug is highly effective and can prevent the progression of MS. The benefit of therapy and the risk of PML must be considered on an individual basis, with regard to the disease activity, the progression and the MRI activity, before natalizumab therapy is implemented.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Maybe it hurts more than you think! - Neonatal pain]

MIKOS Borbála

[Neonatal pain is often undertreated. This is based on the assumption that because of the immature nervous system and the lack of the myelinisation preterm and newborn does not feel pain. It is confirmed by a number of articles that the fetus and neonate can experience and respond to painful events. This publication gives a brief overview of the ontogeny of the pain, short-and long-term postnatal consequences, as well as the perception of the possibility of a particularly frail child population: premature infants and neonates, based on animal and human studies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The impact of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel on health-related quality of life in Parkinson’s disease]

KOVÁCS Norbert, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, ÁCS Péter, BOSNYÁK Edit, DELI Gabriella, JANSZKY József, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Background - The levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) therapy can improve the severe fluctuations associated with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our aim was to assess the improvement in the health related quality of life of PD patients treated with LCIG at University of Pécs. Methods - Eight PD patients were evaluated (age: 68.1±4.4 years, disease duration: 14,5±6,2 years, duration of fluctuations: 8.9±3.1 years). Before the initiation of LCIG treatment and 6 and 12 months later, the health-related quality of life (PDQ-39 and EQ-5D-5L), severity of PDrelated symptoms (MDS-UPDRS, Hoehn-Yahr Scale, Clinical Global Improvement - Severity) and major non-motor symptoms (PD Sleep Scale 2nd version: PDSS-2, Epworth Scale and Beck Depression Inventory: BDI) were assessed. Results - Health-related quality life improved after LCIG treatment measured by both EQ-5D-5L (from 0.257 to 0.662, p=0.009) and PDQ-39 (from 34 to 26 points, p=0.038). Meanwhile PD-related symptoms (MDS-UPDRS total score: from 105 points to 68 points, p<0.05) sleep quality (PDSS-2: from 25 to 22 points, p<0.05), daytime sleepiness (Epworth: from 12 to 7 points, p<0.05) and depression (BDI: from 20 to 15 points, p<0.05) also improved. Median ON time improved form 4.5 hours to 10.0 hours; whereas, the OFF time decreased from 4.5 to 0.5 hours (p<0.05). Conclusion - Both the quality of life and the clinical features of PD can be improved by LCIG treatment in advanced PD.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Single dose irradiation of defined region of rat brain with stereotactic BrainLab system]

FARKAS Róbert, KALINCSÁK Judit, KOVÁCS Péter, ARADI Mihály, BELLYEI Szabolcs, WEICZNER Roland, SEBESTYÉN Zsolt, PLANGÁR Imola, HIDEGHÉTY Katalin

[Background and purpose of our study was to develop a precise dose delivery technique for partial brain irradiation of two rats simultaneously. Methods - Using a self-developed frame stereotactic radiotherapy with single doses of 30-90 Gy was delivered to the frontal lobe of 22 animals. Tolerability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated and dosimetric measurements were conducted to verify the treatment plans. 2, 4 and 6 months after the irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and histopathological examinations were performed to detect late radiation induced biological changes. Results - Immobilization device provided excellent reproducibility and tolerability. Dosimetry revealed good corres - pondence with planned dose distribution, but the measured absorbed dose was 30% lower than the planned dose. During the 6 months follow-up period the procedure related death of subject animals after 30 Gy, 70 Gy and 90 Gy were 0%, 20% and 100% respectively. T2 signal and structural changes on MRI scans found to be dose and time dependent. While 30 Gy caused no detectable structural changes, 70 Gy lead to cystic necrosis in 2 cases after 4 month. Histopathology revealed signs of necrosis on macroscopic examination after 70 Gy in the high dose region involving both frontal lobes, and no obvious microscopic changes in the surrounding area were detectable. Conclusion - Our technique of rat cranial irradiation using human stereotactic system provided high accuracy of single dose delivery for a pair of small animals, resulting in brain injury in the defined area. This method proved to be a reproducible model for preclinical studies on radiation effects.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Examining the diagnostic accuracy of a new migraine screener]

CSÉPÁNY Éva, BOZSIK György, KELLERMANN István, HAJNAL Boglárka, SCHEIDL Erika, PALÁSTI Ágnes, TÓTH Marianna, GYÜRE Tamás, ERTSEY Csaba

[Background - Migraine affects more than 10% of the Hungarian population, causes significant disability and severely affects patients’ generic and condition-specific quality of life. Despite these facts, a significant proportion of patients is not diagnosed and not treated adequately. Headache centres can provide care for only a fraction of all patients. The task of primary care providers would be greatly simplified by a reliable self-administered migraine screening questionnaire. Objective - To develop a short and reliable questionnaire as a migraine screening tool. Methods - Outpatients at the Headache Service, Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University completed a self-administered questionnaire which contained 9 yes/no questions about their headaches’ characteristics. The number of ’yes’ answers (the patients’ total score) was evaluated in connection with the diagnosis based on the International Headache Society criteria. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value as well as the misclassification rate for each total score value and used these to establish the final cutoff value of the questionnaire. 306 patients (242 females, mean age 39.1±13.3 years) were enrolled. The diagnosis was migraine in 244. Results - Completing the questionnaire did not pose any difficulty for the patients. At a cutoff value of 5 points the questionnaire’s sensitivity was 0.96 and specificity was 0.61. The positive predictive value was 0.91 and the negative predictive value was 0.81. The misclassification rate was 0.11. Discussion - Our results show that the questionnaire may help the diagnosis of migraine. In order to use it in medical practice, its further evaluation is necessary on a large representative sample of the Hungarian population.]

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Retinal morphological changes during the two years of follow-up in Parkinson’s disease

ATUM Mahmut, DEMIRYÜREK Enes Bekir

The study aims to investigate the relationship between the progression of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) and retinal morphology. The study was carried out with 23 patients diagnosed with early-stage IPD (phases 1 and 2 of the Hoehn and Yahr scale) and 30 age-matched healthy controls. All patients were followed up at least two years, with 6-month intervals (initial, 6th month, 12th month, 18th month, and 24th month), and detailed neurological and ophthalmic examinations were performed at each follow-up. Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS Part III) scores, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) scores, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, central macular thickness (CMT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were analyzed at each visit. The average age of the IPD and control groups was 43.96 ± 4.88 years, 44.53 ± 0.83 years, respectively. The mean duration of the disease in the IPD group was 7.48 ± 5.10 months at the start of the study (range 0-16). There was no statistically significant difference in BCVA and IOP values between the two groups during the two-year follow-up period (p> 0.05, p> 0.05, respectively). Average and superior quadrant RNFL thicknesses were statistically different between the two groups at 24 months and there was no significant difference between other visits (p=0.025, p=0.034, p> 0.05, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in CMT between the two groups during the follow-up period (p> 0.05). Average and superior quadrant RNFL thicknesses were significantly thinning with the progression of IPD.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Psychometric properties of the Hungarian Adult Attachment Scale]

ŐRI Dorottya, KAPORNAI Krisztina, BAJI Ildikó, KISS Enikő

[The revised Adult Attachment Scale (AAS) developed by N. L. Collins is a widely used questionnaire to measure adult attachment. However, its psychometric properties have not been investigated in Hungary. We aimed to confirm the key psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the AAS focusing on reliability indices on a population that consis­ted of depressed and non-depressed young adults. The AAS is a self-report questionnaire, in which two different dimensional evaluating systems are possible: the original (close, depend, and anxiety) and the alternative scoring system (anxiety, avoidance). Our study population consisted of young adults with a history of major depression (n = 264, median age = 25.7 years) and their never-depressed biological siblings (n = 244, median age = 24.0). The internal consistency of close, anxiety, and avoidance scales were satisfactory (Cronbach-α >0.7). The consistency of the depend scale was slightly lower than expected (Cronbach-α = 0.62). Test-retest reliability was good for all of the scales, it ranged from 0.73 to 0.78 after 14 months of follow-up period. The scale showed good discrimination as tested by the differences of close and anxiety attachment dimensions between the groups (p<0.01). More­over, we were able to differentiate the currently dep­res­sed subjects based on these attachment dimensions. Explo­ra­tory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted, and a bifactor solution proved optimal model fit. The three dimensions of the AAS has not been confirmed. However, the close and anxiety scales of AAS were found to be adequate. Our results also indicate that attachment features correlate with major depressive episodes in adulthood.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses: a literature review]

URBÁN Edit, GAJDÁCS Márió

[Brain abscesses are potentially serious, life-threatening diseases that pose a complex diagnostic challenge not only to neurosurgeons but also to clinical microbiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, infectologists. The etiology of brain abscess is usually polymicrobial, most commonly involving a variety of aerobic and obligate anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiological studies on the anaerobic etiology of brain abscesses are common between the time period of 1960s and 1980s, but today there are very few new publications on the subject. The role of anaerobic bacteria in this disease was presumably underdiagnosed for a very long time, as many laboratories did not have the adequate laboratory capabilities for their cultivation and identification. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on the etiology of obligate anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses, including their prevalence and current therapeutic recommendations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease]

KLIVÉNYI Péter, VÉCSEI László

[The treatment of Parkinson’s disease depends on the symptoms of the patients and obviously the stage of the disease. Several different approaches can be found in the literature. Based on the published data, in this review we try to summarize the different approaches to the disease stages and theirs’ clinical relevance. Actually, one of the most important issue is the recognition of advanced stage and therefore we reviewed the device-aided therapies. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Dopamine agonists in Parkinson’s disease therapy - 15 years of experience of the Neurological Clinics from Tîrgu Mureș. A cross-sectional study ]

SZÁSZ József Attila, CONSTANTIN Viorelia, MIHÁLY István, BIRÓ István, PÉTER Csongor, ORBÁN-KIS Károly, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs

[Background and purpose - There is relatively few data regarding the usage of dopaminagonists for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease; furthermore, there are no publications regarding Central- and Eastern-European countries. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of dopamine agonists as a therapeutic option amongst Parkinson’s disease patients admitted to the Neurological Clinics of Tîrgu Mures during the last 15 years. Methods - In our study we investigated the data of all Parkinson’s patients treated at our clinics between the 1st of January 2003 and the 31st of December 2017. We analyzed the particularities of dopamine agonists’ usage based on the therapeutic recommendations from the final report of these patients. Regarding time since the diagnosis, we divided the patients in two groups: less than or equal to 5 years and more than 5 years. Results - During the studied period a total of 2379 patients with Parkinson’s disease were treated at the Clinics. From the 1237 patients with disease duration under 5 years 665 received dopamine agonists: 120 as monotherapy, 83 together with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and in 234 cases associated with levodopa. The remaining 228 patients were treated with a triple combination of levodopa, dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. In patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease for more than 5 years, in 364 cases out of 653 a dopamine agonist was part of the therapy. Conclusion - The usage of dopamine agonists was similar to the data presented in other studies. We consider that clinicians treating the disease should, with the necessary prudence, use the available and recommended dopamine agonist with the utmost courage to their maximum therapeutic potential.]